Author Archives: Jim "Dr. Dim" Fitzsimons

Bernie Wrightson – One Of The Masters

The world of comic books lost one incredible artist this past weekend. Bernie Wrightson, renown for his mastery of illustrating horror and the macabre, died too young at age 68 after a lengthy battle with brain cancer.

According to his obituary, he did take a correspondence course from the Famous Artists School, but otherwise he was largely self-taught through studying comic books. That astounds me. Well, some artists are just so good they don’t need that much in the way of formal training. I went to art school for three years and that made me a better artist, and I’m better today than I was right after my schooling, but I’d be flattering myself if I thought I could be a quarter as good an illustrator as Mr Wrightson.

Let’s look at some of his work.

73cfd6c327aa0c29652af24236f6988a

This witch illustration is the first image that comes to my mind when I think of Bernie Wrightson. He had a great sense of lighting in his work, which you can see here. He also could vary his inking technique to suggest different textures: flesh, hair, wood, the witch’s garment.

The next two examples show his brush technique in inking really well.

17353425_10155222597217472_8654375810125253217_n

I love the way the zombie’s tattered flesh, hair, and clothing flow downward into the ground as it emerges from its grave. And note how simply Wrightson renders the grave stones in the background and yet they still look so heavy.

17362895_10155222593512472_4436329104359810444_n

Probably Wrightson’s best known character, co-created with Len Wein, Swamp Thing is drawn here in such a way as to make him as much a part of nature as the tree behind him. He is a part of that swamp. Wrightson uses virtually the same texture when rendering Swamp Thing as he does with the tree.

Wrightson also worked in color. I’m including a piece from later in his career. It’s the cover for the third book of his Batman: The Cult series. The art within the books was good, but not quite at the same standard as his earlier work. However, the face of the bad guy being threatened by the Caped Crusader on this cover is fantastic!

3239

Finally, I’m including a piece from what must be considered Bernie Wrightson’s masterwork: his illustrated edition of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s Frankenstein. The artist worked on the 50 or so illustrations in this edition for about seven years. The quality is amazing. This one illustration demonstrates Wrightson’s brilliance with pen and ink. The textures and details he captures are incredible. There’s stone, wood, flesh, glass, cloth, water all in there and everything feels right.

17353583_10155222596592472_7270060612596013661_n

He masterfully directs the viewers’ eyes through that laboratory to the spot where Frankenstein’s creation demands to know why. Why did the doctor defy the will of God and bring him to life?

Bernie Wrightson was one of the masters and we can be thankful to have such a body of work to ponder and be humbled, amazed, and inspired by.

I’m feeling the itch to draw.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Tagged , , , ,

1982 Gave Us These 10 Excellent Alternative (Mostly) Albums…

Continuing with my look at excellent alternative albums from the days of yore (or from when I was young and kept up with what was going on), this week I’ll be listing ten albums released in 1982. I have previously covered 1979, 1980, 1985, and in one blog the combined years 1986-1989. Yes, I’m jumping around, but it keeps you on your toes.

Since I do only ten albums, there are years that some great releases are left off my list. I limit my choices to albums I know, so some really good albums don’t make the cut because I don’t know them well enough. For example, Devo released their fifth album – Oh, No! It’s Devo!– in 1982. I’m only familiar with three or four of the tracks, so it’s not on the list.

Enough preamble! On with the list.

As always, these are my choices. Your results may vary.

3c7f81cd32db2690f66b265250170363

10) Violent Femmes – Violent Femmes This three-member band out of Wisconsin produced a pretty ear-catching debut album. Mostly acoustic, this collection of songs displays angst, anger, and sexual frustration as well as most electric-based punk ever did. And there’s xylophone! Some stand out tracks include Kiss Off, Add It Up, and the sports arena favorite Blister In The Sun.

Favorite Track : Gone Daddy Gone

The_Jam's_The_Gift

9) The Gift – The Jam By the time The Jam, one of the UK’s most popular bands to emerge from the Punk/New Wave scene, recorded this their last album, their sound was far more ’60s Pop than the crashing drums, clanging guitar, and thumping bass of their first few releases. They were much more refined in the sound and, as it turned out, Paul Weller was ready to move on. As swan song albums go, this one is awfully good.

Favorite Track: Town Called Malice

2700098

8) The Sky’s Gone Out – Bauhaus This third album by the Godfathers of Goth is my favorite by the band. There’s an excellent opening track which is a cover of Brian Eno’s Third Uncle and plenty of other dark and brooding tunes to be found. Spirit would have gotten the favorite track status, but I prefer the single version.

Favorite Track: All We Ever Wanted Was Everything

R-2311147-1300842753.jpeg

7) All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes – Pete Townshend Of course, this entry explains the use of “mostly” in the headline. Townshend really can’t be considered alternative, but he’s my favorite songwriter, so he’s on the list. This album was more musically challenging than the more accessible Empty Glass (1980), Townshend’s most commercially successful solo effort. Among the more challenging songs such as The Sea Refuses No River, Stardom In Acton, and Exquisitely Bored can be found the pop gems Face Dances Pt2 and Stop Hurting People.

Favorite Track: Slit Skirts

R.E.M._-_Chronic_Town

6) Chronic Town – REM This EP announced the arrival of a small college town band that would become superstars of rock by the end of the decade. Five tight, bouncy, jangly guitar-dominated tunes with mumbled lyrics are all that is offered, but it was enough to change the direction of alternative music for decades to come. It’s a landmark.

Favorite Track: Gardening At Night

R-449231-1276029385.jpeg

5) Peter Gabriel (Security) – Peter Gabriel Gabriel was still reluctant to name his albums, but this album was labeled Security when released in the States and in Canada. Whatever its name, it may be my favorite album by the former member of the UK prog band Genesis. My favorite track turned out to be a hit and the video of the song demonstrated that videos could be (should be) more than just featuring the artist miming the song in a faux concert performance. Videos could be (should be) art.

Favorite Track: Shock The Monkey

R-1336113-1343943606-4467.jpeg

4) Stink – The Replacements Another EP makes the list with the second release by the critic’s darlings from Minneapolis. Just eight blazingly quick tracks, none lasting more than three minutes and most under two, showcase the punk ethos of these rock ‘n’ rollers. There are glimpses of the more refined pop sound that would come with age and experience. For now the boys are still pretty hardcore.

Favorite Track: Kids Don’t Follow

The_Clash_-_Combat_Rock

3) Combat Rock – The Clash Sure, this album made it to #7 on the US album charts and earned double platinum status also in the States, but The Clash were still a bunch of punk rockers. Joe Strummer went on walkabout and disappeared from the public eye for a time because he was overwhelmed by the band’s success. Well, it is a very good album that produced a couple of hits: Should I Stay Or Should I Go and Rock The Casbah.

Favorite Track: Know Your Rights

xtc_english_settlement

2) English Settlement – XTC This was the last album XTC would record before the band stopped touring. It’s a transition album showing how the band was moving from the heavy guitar pop/rock with a little quirk thrown in to more lush productions. No Thugs In Our House is really the only rocker on this double album which is giving over to a more pop yet pastoral sound. Stand out tracks include Runaways, English Roundabout, Snowman, All Of A Sudden, and Jason And The Argonauts.

Favorite Track: Senses Working Overtime

22923-the-blurred-crusade

1) The Blurred Crusade – The Church This sophomore effort by Australia’s The Church might just be their best. The guitar playing is fantastic and Steve Kilbey’s vocals are mesmerizing. There is plenty of the ethereal atmosphere that was signature to the band’s sound included in the more rocking tunes (my favorite track is a good example). Almost With You is a great opening track and To Be In Your Eyes is one of my favorite loves songs of all time. The band would produce other terrific albums, but I don’t think they ever quite matched this one.

Favorite Track: You Took

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

An Unexpected Rabbit Hole

In January, the world was saddened by the news that Mary Tyler Moore had died. Lots of us had grown up watching her on TV, first as Laura Petrie on the Dick Van Dyke Show (1961-1966) and then as Mary Richards on the Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970-1977). And over the years she further impressed us with her many acting roles in television and in film. Most memorable for me was her performance as the cold and controlling, yet deeply wounded, mother and wife in Robert Redford’s Ordinary People (1980).

Her death has generated numerous tributes to her as a person and to her life and her work. And that’s what led me to a rabbit hole that took me on a rather interesting and, at times, frustrating journey of discovery. Not the discovery of my inning self and my emotions. I don’t have any of those.

No, it was a journey to discover just what is that line in the lyrics of Love Is All Around, the theme to the Mary Tyler Moore Show?!

For all these years, I had thought the lyrics to the chorus were:

“Love is all around, no need to waste it.
You can have this town, why don’t you take it?
You’re gonna make it after all.”

But last Friday morning, in the Bulletin Board (an online forum in which regular folks can tell stories, jokes, make observations, share pictures,etc) a contributor noted that a recent Nancy comic strip’s tribute to Mary had quoted, according this fellow, the lyrics wrong.

170303bbcut-mtmnancy

The incorrect line was: “You can have a town, why don’t you take it?”

According to this Bulletin Boarder, the actual line is: “You can never tell, why don’t you take it?”

The person rather snarkily noted that people whose hearing was intact back then, and even now, could be certain it was “never tell,” not some line about having a (or in my case, this) town. In fact, the person noted, “I wish I’d kept track of how many tributes I’ve seen with the misheard version.”

Nearly 47 years and now this revelation? I was stunned!

However, I’m a skeptic, so I thought I better do some digging to see if I could verify this “never tell” claim. Thus began the journey of discovery.

You should be aware of a phenomenon known as priming. Priming can happen when a person is told what they should be able to hear when they listen to poor quality audio or even audio played backwards. Once you are told what to hear, it’s rather difficult, maybe even impossible, to not hear it. That’s priming.

And I found out that knowing about priming doesn’t protect you from falling victim to it.

In my search to determine the true lyrics, my first step was to look up the lyrics online. I found conflicting information. A couple websites had the “never tell” line, while others had versions of the “town” line. Hmm. However, one of the websites with the “never tell” line was the Boston Globe. They are a well-respected news source, so I started thinking I had been wrong about the “town” line. Or was I being primed?

Next I found several versions of the song on YouTube. The song was written and recorded by Sonny Curtis (not Paul Williams as some people have thought), who was a member of Buddy Holly’s Crickets and had been previously best known for writing the Bobby Fuller Four hit – I Fought The Law. Several of the versions I found were recorded by Curtis. There were two versions for the show: One for the first season and one for the rest of the series with some changed lyrics, but both versions retained the “never tell/town” line. Curtis also recorded two additional versions, which he released as singles, one in 1970 and the other in 1980. They still had the same lyrics to the disputed line, even though the instrumentation of the songs was different.

There are also several cover versions of the song. Sammy Davis Jr, Joan Jett, and, 80s punk band from St. Paul, Husker Du have all covered it. It’s not quite clear if it’s “never tell” or “town” on Sammy’s and Joan’s versions, but Husker Du clearly say “town.” In fact, they even sing it the way I’ve heard it as “this town” not “the town” or “a town.”

I was beginning to lean toward “never tell,” because I had put my faith in the Boston Globe‘s journalistic prowess, but I still wasn’t sure. It’s really hard to determine just what is the line.

Then it hit me! Sonny Curtis is still alive! At least according to Google. I found that he has a Facebook page and an official website. I couldn’t be certain he would get my messages, but I sent messages to both sources. I pleaded to him for an answer.

By the end of that Friday’s tumble down the rabbit hole, I received an email from the man himself. (Well, the email claimed it was him. I don’t want to go down another rabbit hole, so I’ll just accept that it was him.)

I’ll allow Mr Curtis to settle this once and for all.

“Hi Jim,

Thanks for your interest in the Mary Tyler Moore Theme.  Below with my compliments are the lyrics.

Mary Tyler Moore Theme
Words and Music by Sonny Curtis

Who can turn the world on with her smile
Who can take a nothing day and suddenly
make it all seem worthwhile

Well it’s you girl and you should know it
With each glance and every little movement
you show it

Chorus:

Love is all around no need to waste it
You can have the town why don’t you take it
You’re gonna make it after all

Published by Sony/ATV Music

Hope this is helpful.

All the best,
Sonny Curtis”

Very helpful! Thank you, Mr Curtis!

Oh! And, in your face! Mr Bulletin Boarder who thinks his hearing is so good!

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

 

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Another Month, Another Great Cover

One of my favorite parts of my job entering comic books into Nostalgia Zone‘s online catalog is getting to check out some pretty cool comic book covers. I get to see books that I might not have sought out, because they aren’t part of what I’m interested in in comic books. I was never a fan of Archie comics. The Harvey titles never did anything for me. I’m just not into funny comic books. I’m a Marvel Comics kid and I like superheroes.

I have a running list of great covers from our catalog, so I have plenty of material for this monthly series. And this time? Dude! It’s a Dell.

Dell Comics didn’t do much for me as a comic book collector either. They did some superhero stuff in their wide range of genres, but those superheroes were…kinda lame. Dell did many movie and television show adaptations, along with science fiction and ghost stories, Westerns and war stories. But they mostly did the funny stuff. They believed in the comic part of comic books.

154502

This month’s great cover (see above) comes from Dell Comics‘ Four Color series. Each month, in the Four Color series would be a different featured character or genre even. Dell would rotate these characters and genres, so one month you’d get a Zane Grey Western, the next month would be an Andy Panda story, then there would be Donald Duck, and the month after that would be Bugs Bunny. The characters and genres would rotate, so a few months later readers would get a new book with Donald Duck or Zane Grey, etc.

From comic books’ Golden Age (1938 – 1955), I present Dell Four Color #200 (October 1948) featuring Bugs Bunny, Super Sleuth. The artist was Ralph Heimdahl and his work is terrific. These old school comic book illustrators really were masters at inking. Look at the weight variation of Heimdahl’s line work. Very expressive and disciplined.

I like Bugs‘ pose and the look on his face. Normally, Bugs was super cool and in control, but there were times when he would be affected by fear. This cover is one of those times.

Bugs also feels as though he is in a place, a setting. There is a real feel to our hero standing on stairs and heading into a scary house. Most covers featuring cartoon characters such as Bugs are more character focused, with little or no background. This one deviates from those typical covers by giving Bugs a place to inhabit.

The composition is excellent. The rendering and dark coloring of the wall, stairs, and banisters, along with our hero’s expression and pose, give a feeling of mystery and danger. The motion lines at the bottom of the bright yellow door indicate Bugs is opening the door quickly so as to possibly catch someone in the act. Just what does he see inside that house?

It’s a great cover.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Tagged , , ,

You Know What’s A Really Good Plane Crash Movie?

mpw-55660

A really good plane crash movie is Robert Aldrich’s The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) starring James Stewart as Frank Towns, a grizzled old veteran pilot from the days when the pleasure of flying could be found in “just getting there.” But, he’s not quite the hotshot pilot of his youth now that he’s flying a rickety old twin engine Fairchild C-82 Packet cargo plane for an oil company insensitively named Arabco (pronounced ah-RAB-coh), shuttling supplies and oil workers across the Sahara desert. As a navigator, Towns’ flying partner Lew Moran (Richard Attenborough), isn’t too bad. However, he spent a little too much time sipping from the bottle to notice the radio equipment was faulty.

The film opens as the flying veterans are transporting several oil workers, an oil company accountant, two British military men, a doctor, his patient, and a rather peevish German engineer to Benghazi. The group are ably played by several great character actors including George Kennedy, Ian Bannen (who was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his role), Peter Finch, Dan Duryea, and Ernest Borgnine. But it’s Hardy Kruger who steals the show as he plays the German engineer, Heinrich Dorfmann, who turns out to be the man with the plan.

A sandstorm pushes the plane well off course and forces Towns to make a crash landing as the blowing sand clogs the engines. Two of the passengers are killed in the crash, while a third is seriously injured. The rest face the hostile desert conditions with little water and even less hope of rescue.

Dorfmann has an idea.

Although the plane is totaled, there is enough left intact and plenty of tools and equipment that a new plane could be constructed from the remains. Towns dismisses the idea initially, but the doctor tells him having the men work to build the new plane would give them hope. A baseless hope perhaps, but it would be better than the lot of them just watching each other die. So, the project begins.

1180-2

The film follows the men as they labor and lose hope and find resolve again to attempt to escape the desert. There are clashes between the men as the tensions rise and the water runs low, but most contentious of all of the clashes is the constant head butting done between the pilot and the engineer. Towns is certain it won’t fly and is convinced he will cause more deaths if he tries to get the contraption off the ground. Dorfmann seems to be more interested in just seeing it made. Lew keeps finding himself having to act as a go-between to try to keep the two headstrong men on the task of getting back to civilization.

phoenix3

There’s a scene of very satisfying retribution meted out by the old pilot involving the insubordinate British sergeant after a particularly tragic event. The moment takes advantage of Stewart’s mastery of portraying righteous rage. And then there’s the revelation as to the kind of engineer Dorfmann is that brings Lew close to the edge of mental collapse. Attenborough plays the moment perfectly.

hqdefault

In 2004, a remake was made that felt it necessary to bring in shoot outs and chase scenes, not realizing the tension, the action, and the story were the men and their desperate attempt to complete the “Phoenix” before their water, their strength, their sanity, and, ultimately, their lives ran out.

The film could use a slight trim as it comes in at 142 minutes, but it holds your attention as you root for these guys to get to safety. And watching Stewart and Kruger spar with each other is very entertaining.

“Get the popcorn ready, kids, we got us a good movie to watch!”

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Tagged , , ,

Ranking XTC: Less Great to Most Great

There’s a thing about lists ranking movies, TV shows, albums, etc. by their level of quality – subjectivity. These kinds of lists are just opinions and, no matter how reasoned the list-makers think they’ve been, someone is bound to disagree. At best, the list gives people unfamiliar with the topic an overview and recommendations on where to start exploring the theme. At worst, it gives the list-maker the chance to smack talk about a subject they might think to be overrated in general.

A list ranking the British Pop band XTC‘s albums from worst to best has surfaced on an XTC Facebook fan page. It has stirred up some controversy. First of all, even though I understand the technicality of language when describing a ranking list, how can a consistently great recording artist, such as XTC, have a worst album? In my opinion, they just don’t have one. They may have worst songs, some I flat out don’t like or even hate, but not a worst album in the bunch.

That’s why my list goes from less great to most great. I will handle this list in much the same way as my other ranking lists, but I might include a song pick which demonstrates a failure, in my opinion, in the band’s usual high quality. I’m also including the two albums by XTC‘s alter-ego: The Dukes of Stratosphear.

Again, this is my list, my opinion. Your results may vary.

xtc_white_music

14) White Music (1978) This one is a bit uneven, I think mainly due to the band attempting to find its voice. Overall, the album has all that quirkiness that defined the band in their early years, which works most of the time. It seems Colin Moulding is trying a little too hard to be quirky on two of the three songs he wrote, but I’ll Set Myself On Fire is a good early effort. Radios In Motion is a fantastic opening track and Andy Partridge also scores well with Into The Atom Age, New Town Animal, and This Is Pop? (I do agree with that other list-maker that the later single version of this song is much better). However, their cover of Dylan’s All Along The Watchtower really does fall flat.

Favorite track: Statue Of Liberty

big-express

13) The Big Express (1984) Plenty of greatness to be found, but for me the album tends to go a little heavy on the bashing drums side, as on Reign Of Blows and Train Running Low On Soul Coal. However, there is some quiet subtlety to be found on This World Over. Other stand-outs include You’re The Wish You Are I Had and I Remember The Sun. And my favorite song on the album is another fantastic opening track.

Favorite track: Wake Up

xtc_go_2

12) Go 2 (1978) Released the same year as their first album, Go 2 shows Partridge and Moulding getting better at their songwriting. They are more focused on this their sophomore effort. Keyboardist Barry Andrews contributes two songs (My Weapon and Super-Tuff) which are early efforts for him and are OK. There’s some quirkiness still to be found on Meccanik Dancing (Oh We Go!), Buzz City Talking, and Jumping In Gomorrah; but more thoughtful songwriting emerges with Battery Brides (Andy Paints Brian).

Favorite track: Are You Receiving Me?

dukes_of_stratosphear_psonicpsunspot

11) Psonic Psunspot – The Dukes Of Stratosphear (1987) This is the second album for which the fellows donned their disguise as a 60s Psychedelic band. If you are a fan of 60s Pop and Psychedelic music, you will be a fan of the Dukes. Lots of catchy tunes and another terrific opening track : The Vanishing Girl. Other greats include Pale And Precious, Collideascope, and Shiny Cage.

Favorite track: Brainiac’s Daughter

510nbhjzs9l-_sy300_

10) Mummer (1983) Continuing in the direction of more a pastoral Pop sound that was started on 1982’s English Settlement (I’ll get to it!), Mummer was XTC’s first studio album after the band decided to stop touring. It sounds like an album that wasn’t intended to be played live. Softer, more acoustic songs (Ladybird, Wonderland, In Loving Memory Of A Name) dominate, with the exception of Funk Pop A Roll, written by Partridge when he thought the band was about to be dropped by their record label.

Favorite track: Great Fire

31v5at2kr3l

9) Wasp Star (Apple Venus Vol. 2) (2000) XTC’s swan song album is better than some folks give it credit as being. It’s got plenty of catchy tunes, including what I think is Moulding’s best song since My Bird Performs from 1992’s Nonsuch (Yes, I’ll get to that one, too!): Standing In For Joe. The band’s tradition of excellent opening tracks continues with Playground. And there are other gems to be found: I’m The Man Who Murdered Love, In Another Life, and Church Of Women.

Favorite track: The Wheel And The Maypole

xtc_nonsuch

8) Nonsuch (1992) XTC’s last album before their seven year strike against and subsequent liberation from the Virgin label builds on the groundwork laid by their 1989 album, Oranges & Lemons. (Yes, yes! Be patient.) Some have said it’s a little too similar to that previous effort. Perhaps, but there’s still some really good stuff on here. Dear Madam Barnum, The Disappointed, That Wave, Omnibus, the aforementioned My Bird Performs, and Wrapped In Grey. All great tunes. But I was never fond of Rook and Bungalow. They just don’t work for me.

Favorite track: Then She Appeared

r-2093384-1279979715-png

7) Oranges & Lemons (1989) Another great opening track, Garden Of Earthly Delights, leads to an album filled with earthly delights: King For A Day, The Loving, Scarecrow People, One Of The Millions, Pink Thing… Whew! I haven’t even gotten to my favorite track yet. There’s also Poor Skeleton Steps Out, in which I learned I wasn’t the only person in the world who thought of our skeletons as separate living entities trapped inside our bodies. Andy and I are on the same page there.

Favorite track: (And just how the hell wasn’t this a mega-hit?!) Mayor Of Simpleton

dukes_25oclock

6) 25 O’Clock – The Dukes Of Stratosphear (1985) This was the first time the boys adopted new identities and brought in Dave Gregory’s brother Ian to play drums to produce an homage to their favorite tunes and artists of the 60s. The budget wasn’t big, which is why it was kept to a mere six songs, but they put every penny’s worth on the vinyl. It’s great from start to finish.

Favorite track: The Mole From The Ministry

xtc_drums_and_wires

5) Drums & Wires (1979) Barry Andrews was out and Dave Gregory was in on this the third XTC album. Gregory’s entry not only eliminated Andrew’s manic keyboards, it expanded the guitar sound of the group. He also helped lead the band into their more pastoral, less quirky sound of their later releases. Moulding’s songwriting had greatly improved by this album and he steals the show by contributing all its best songs, which includes my favorite track and Day In Day Out, Ten Feet Tall, and That Is The Way. They all outshine Partridge’s songs. Not that Andy’s songs are bad. Oh, no. When You’re Near Me I Have Difficulty, Millions, and the terrific Complicated Game are nothing to sneeze at.

Favorite track: Making Plans For Nigel

41wga5xv5dl

4) Apple Venus Vol. 1 (1999) It had been seven years since XTC fans had some new material from their favorite band. Did they break up? What had they been doing? The band went on strike against Virgin in 1992. They didn’t like their deal and the way Virgin didn’t promote them. The band finally won their freedom and went to work on this masterful album. Partridge called it an orchoustic effort, combining orchestral arrangments with mainly acoustic songs. It really is very good. Moulding’s songs, two in total, are fine, but they just don’t quite measure up to his prestrike songwriting. Partridge, however, is firing on all cylinders. Greenman, The Last Balloon, Easter Theatre, I Can’t Own Her, Harvest Festival are all lush and beautiful. The circular orchestration of the brassy River of Orchids may make it a challenging opening track, but it is a piece of excellent songwriting. Even the bitter and sad song about the dissolution of a marriage, Your Dictionary,  has its beauty and manages to uplift by the end. This album was worth the wait.

Favorite track: I’d Like That

xtc_english_settlement

3) English Settlement (1982) This is where XTC began to go into more acoustic and pastoral songs. A lushness began to find its way into their sound on songs such as Runaways, All Of A Sudden, Jason And The Argonauts, Yacht Dance, and Snowman. There’s even a couple attempts at straight up dance songs: Melt The Guns, Down In The Cockpit. This double album also has the distinction of containing both my favorite and my most hated XTC songs. I can’t stand, and never could, Leisure. Its herky-jerky, start and stop pacing punctuated by Partridge barking, “Leisure!” really puts me off. The song only gets going at the very end just as it begins to fade. But my favorite XTC song is there to balance everything out.

Favorite track: Senses Working Overtime

1952809

2) Black Sea (1980) This is the first XTC album I ever heard. It also contains the first XTC song I ever heard, Respectable Street. This album has the group almost completely losing their quirk factor and rocking out some very hook-laden pop tunes. I don’t think there’s a dud on the entire album. Partridge might disagree as he wasn’t too fond of Sgt. Rock (Is Going To Help Me), but I think that song has a certain light-hearted charm. Moulding only contributes two tracks, but they do include the excellent Generals & Majors. But it’s Partridge who is in complete command of this album. Living Through Another Cuba, Rocket From A Bottle, Paper & Iron, Burning With Optimism’s Flame, No Language In Our Lungs…Whoa! Outstanding!

Favorite track: Towers Of London

skylarking

1) Skylarking (1986) That controversial list that inspired this blog at least got this one right. The writer also put this album at number one. And it is brilliant. Out of the struggles between Partridge and producer Todd Rundgren, came this loose concept album of the passing of a single summer day. Rundgren came up with the concept and the running order of the songs they were to record after listening to the demos, but before consulting with Andy. Contentious recording sessions still yielded this masterpiece. From start to finish it is a brilliant piece of Pop music. And it provided XTC their first radio hit in America. Sort of. The song was Dear God, but it wasn’t included on the first pressing of the album. It was a B-side for the first single, Grass. American DJs liked it and played it into a hit and onto the second pressing. Stand out tracks on an album of nothing but stand outs include Summer’s Cauldron, Season Cycle, The Meeting Place, and The Man Who Sailed Around His Soul. In 2010, the album was remastered and an audio problem was corrected and it was re-released on vinyl. The song Mermaid Smiled was returned to the album, it had been removed to make room for Dear God, but the atheist anthem was still included. The original album art concept by Partridge was also used for this reissue, but it’s a little too risque to go with here. You can Google it if you are curious.

Favorite track: Earn Enough For Us

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Tagged ,

Pods Looking Back: A List of My Favorite Nostalgic Podcasts

You know, I’m no different than anybody else. I start each day and I end each night. (10 points if you get this reference.) And like most everybody else, I listen to podcasts. Comedy podcasts, science podcasts, podcasts on skepticism, podcasts about movies. I even do my own podcast (Dimland Radio – look for it on iTunes) that has a little of all those things and more.

Well, I thought I’d recommend a few of my favorite podcasts that are nostalgic in nature and content. Are you game?

justone_box

Just One More Thing: A Podcast About Columbo Hosts Jon Morris and RJ White invite a guest to each show to help them examine an episode of the world’s favorite TV detective: Lt. Columbo. They give their impressions of each show, including the original episodes from the 1970s and the more recent ones from when the rumpled detective returned in 1989 and ran through 2003.

The show is funny and the hosts give plenty of production and background information of this classic murder mystery-solving program. They speculate about the existence of Mrs. Columbo (they’ve even done a review of an episode of the short-lived Mrs. Columbo series), they try to pin-point the moment Columbo catches onto who the murderer is, and they marvel at how the detective out-thinks his suspects as they constantly underestimate him.

RJ tends to excitedly blurt out interruptions of the others during the podcast, but it is part of his charm. The only other drawback I can think of is they actually liked Last Salute To The Commodore.

600x600bb

Gilbert Gottfried’s Amazing Colossal Podcast & Gilbert and Frank’s Colossal Obsessions Each show, comic genius Gilbert Gottfried is joined by Frank Santopadre as they alternate between the main show and the mini episodes. The main show features a guest, often with one foot in the grave, to talk about the old days of entertainment. The stories get very bawdy and we frequently hear of the strange sexual practices of celebrities of yore, as well as plenty of discussion of the size of Milton Berle’s naughty bit.

The mini episodes have Gilbert and Frank talking about a particular obsession with old movies, TV shows, songs, etc.

Be warned! Gilbert sings on virtually every show. Otherwise, the podcasts are thoroughly entertaining.

logo-v3_47

The Greatest Generation No, it’s not about Tom Brokaw’s favorite generation. This podcast is hosted by Benjamin Harrison and Adam Pranica, who admit they are both a little bit embarrassed to be doing a podcast about Star Trek: The Next Generation. It’s silly and it’s fun with plenty of dick and fart jokes thrown in.

The hosts watch an episode, going in order, and try to figure out if it was a good show or not. They have running jokes about an inappropriate relationship between Capt. Picard and young Wesley Crusher (the boy?), Cmdr. Riker’s absolute need for sexual consent and his lascivious use of the holodeck, and how Data is way too dangerous to be allowed to remain in Star Fleet. And each host has their pick of a “Drunk Shimoda.” You’ll have to listen to learn what that is.

you-must-remember-this

You Must Remember This Host Karina Longworth takes listeners on a journey through the “secret and/or forgotten history of Hollywood’s first century.” Not as funny as the other podcasts on this list, but this show is well-researched and is endlessly fascinating. The production is very good with Longworth and other voice talent playing parts of the producers, writers, actors, and moguls of old Hollywood.

If you are a fan of old Hollywood and are interested in its history, this should go to the top of your list.

Each of these suggested podcasts use adult language and themes, so they may not be suitable for all listeners. All are available through iTunes.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Tagged , , ,