Another Ten Pretty Passable Alt Albums, This Time From 1983

Well, they are more than merely passable. They’re pretty damn good and a few are great, in my opinion. The year is 1983 and these albums all fall into the alternative category, although a couple of them are by artists who were on their way to the big time. One of these bands was about to become rock superstars. Hint: It wasn’t The Replacements.

So far I have done lists for 1979, 1980, 1982, 1985, and the combined years of 1986 – 1989.

As I always say, this is my list. Your results may vary.

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10) Burning From The Inside – Bauhaus Due to illness, Peter Murphy’s contribution to this the fourth album by UK Gothic rock pioneers was lessened. David J and Daniel Ash did more of the song writing than before and took on more lead vocals. It’s been suggested that Murphy’s absence and the increased involvement of J and Ash led to the break-up of the band shortly after its release. The dark and disturbing title track, along with Slice Of Life, Honeymoon Croon, and the uplifting Hope are all standout tracks.

Favorite track: She’s In Parties

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9) Violent Femmes – Violent Femmes The debut album of this sex-angst-ridden band out of Wisconsin is largely acoustic in sound, but punk to its core. However, who could possibly have known in 1983 that the opening track – Blister In The Sun – would become a staple song clip played at sporting events all over America? Weird. Oh! Did I mentioned there’s xylophone! Well, there is!

Favorite track: Gone Daddy Gone

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8) Subterranean Jungle – Ramones Three cover songs (Little Bit O’ Soul, I Need Your Love, and Time Has Come Today) and a harder edge to most of their original songs for the album had critics describing Subterranean Jungle as somewhat of a return to these New York punkers’ roots. Of course, the album didn’t sell as well as any by REO Speedwagon, but I do recall hearing Little Bit O’ Soul on the radio, however briefly. And ever the romantic, Joey delivers one of the band’s better love songs – My-My Kind Of A Girl.

Favorite track: Psycho Therapy

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7) Hootenanny – The Replacements A little disjointed with a couple of the tracks capturing this Minneapolis band’s legendary drunkenness, but the album also sees Paul Westerberg maturing as a songwriter with such songs as Color Me Impressed and Willpower. Lovelines is an entertaining trip through the personals ads with lyrics pulled directly from actual ads.

Favorite track: Within Your Reach

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6) Speaking In Tongues – Talking Heads It took five albums, but the artsy fartsy punk band from New York finally got a Top 10 single with the opening track – Burning Down The House. The band was on its way to becoming stars in the rock world, but they are not the superstars to which I was referring.

Favorite track: This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody)

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5) War – U2 This is the band I meant when I mentioned rock superstars. They hadn’t gotten there as of 1983. It would take a another four years and the release of The Joshua Tree to make these Irish rockers kings of the world of rock and pop. However, this album was awfully damn successful, selling 11 million copies worldwide. Sunday Bloody Sunday, Seconds, Two Hearts Beat As One, and Surrender are all great tracks.

Favorite track: New Year’s Day

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4) Metal Circus – Husker Du Main rivals of The Replacements, these hardcore punks out of St. Paul were rising fast in the indie/college rock scene. It’s been said Husker Du practically invented alternative music. Technically an EP, Metal Circus had the band transitioning from the speed/trash hardcore of their earlier efforts to the more melodic alternative sound of their next two albums – Zen Arcade and New Day Rising.

Favorite track: First Of The Last Calls

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3) Mummer – XTC The first album recorded by this band from Swindon, England after they had confined themselves to the studio due to Andy Partridge’s live performance ending stage fright. No longer concerned about playing the songs live opened new avenues and textures for the band to explore. Drummer Terry Chambers would leave the band before the recording of Mummer was complete, because he preferred to be in a band that would play live. Their music continued moving away from the early quirkiness and then more rocking sound to a more acoustic and pastoral sound, the one exception being the last track – Funk Pop A Roll. Notable songs include Wonderland, Great Fire, and In Loving Memory Of A Name.

Favorite track: Love On A Farmboy’s Wages

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2) Murmur – REM REM could be considered to have reached that same rock superstardom as was achieved by U2. Maybe not quite as super, but they got close. Along with Husker Du, REM was instrumental in setting the foundation of what would come to be known as alternative rock. And Murmur is a landmark album. Indistinct vocals by Michael Stipe were surrounded by the driving, jangly guitar sound of Peter Buck throughout this collection of catchy college radio pop featuring such terrific songs as Catapult, Moral Kiosk, Laughing, and Pilgrimage.

Favorite track: Radio Free Europe

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1) Soul Mining – The The As this debut album was made, Matt Johnson was essentially the only member of the band. He did have several musicians lend a hand, but there was no official band. From the opening track – I’ve Been Waitin’ For Tomorrow (All Of My Life) – to the final track (on the American vinly release) – Perfect – it’s nothing but fantastic songs. Sophisticated and danceable and totally pleasurable. Jools Holland of Squeeze sits in to play my most favoritest piano solo on my favorite track. It’s killer!

Favorite track: Uncertain Smile

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In Search Of…Good Evidence

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In 1973, television producer Alan Landsburg made an hour long TV documentary called In Search Of Ancient Astronauts. It was based on the highly popular yet poorly evidenced book Chariots of the Gods? by Erich von Daniken. Von Daniken was convinced ancient humans were just too dumb and unskilled to be able to build and erect the massive structures and statues they left behind. How could those primitive peoples have done it without the help of space aliens?

Not long after the release of von Daniken’s tome of pseudoscience and pseudohistory, PBS’s program Nova examined his ideas. Nova presented much more logical and consistent with the evidence explanations. You can watch the entire program here. The video quality isn’t great, but the science is.

I’ll let Nova cover the skeptical angle, while I reminisce about a favorite TV series of my youth.

Landsburg produced two more hour long pseudoscience programs in 1975: In Search of Ancient Mysteries and The Outer Space Connection. All three programs featured Rod Serling as narrator and were popular enough to lead to the syndicated program: In Search Of…

Serling was set to be the narrator and host, but his death made his availability questionable, so Leonard Nimoy stepped in. I can’t think of a better second choice. Nimoy’s voice, look, and demeanor were perfect. He gave the show a sense of dramatic gravitas that few other actors could. Serling might have done well, but I think good ole Mr Spock was lightning in a bottle.

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It was April 1977 when In Search Of… first aired and for the next five years, Landsburg and Nimoy would set the template for the many, many pseudoscience promoting programs that followed. The writing style, the tone of narration, and the kind of music featured on the show became that template. The topics covered were the typical mysteries: Bigfoot, UFOs, the Bermuda Triangle, the Loch Ness Monster, ghosts, psychic powers, etc. Everything was presented with as little regard to science as possible, while dressing it up as though there was science being done. The mysteries must be preserved.

And I loved it!

Yes, I was a kid then and pretty naive. I believed it all. The show thrilled and scared me. I thought ghosts might visit me in the night. If I was walking through the woods, I was certain bigfoot was following me. Right there! See it? Oh, that’s just a dead tree. No! Behind the dead tree!! Ahhhh! Run!

Ahem. Sorry.

Not all of the shows were paranormal in theme. There were shows about Jack the Ripper, DB Cooper, Carlos the Jackal, Vincent van Gogh, Eva Braun, and Jim Jones. The Jim Jones show was actually a pretty good little documentary covering Jones’ rise and fall. The show was produced less than three years after the murders and mass suicide that brought Jonestown to an end. There were interviews with people who had been involved in Jones’ cult. They gave an inside account of how his church had started with such promise, but its leader’s paranoia and God complex became too much to sustain. There were even people interviewed who were living in the camp and escaped the day of the tragedy in November 1978. It’s well done and truly fascinating.

In 2012, the entire series was made available on DVD. I splurged and bought it. The set includes the three shows with Rod Serling and the brief reboot series from 2002 featuring Mitch Pileggi (The X-Files’ Assistant Director Skinner). I’ve rewatched the entire original series and I watched the Serling shows. I haven’t watched the 2002 reboot. No offense to Pileggi, but he’s no Rod Serling or Leonard Nimoy.

Since the show had gone off the air, I have become a skeptic. I no longer believe many of the things I did as a kid. I recognize the evidence presented on In Search Of… was very flimsy. As I watched the shows again, I kept reacting skeptically to what was being presented. “Oh, come on! Atlantis didn’t exist! Plato made it up!” “Yeah, great anecdote. Where’s the evidence?” “That’s a device to talk to ghosts? It looks an old phonograph with some surplus electronic doo-dads and some Christmas lights tied to it.”

I have plenty of favorite moments, but I’ll only lay one on ya.

In the second episode of season two, the show profiles the 18th century gentleman Count of Saint-Germain or, the more ominously named, the “man who would not die.” You see, this Count was a worldly gentleman, clearly an educated man who was said to speak several languages, each so well he fooled natives. He would tell stories of historic events that were so intimate and detailed people believed he was there. How could he have been? He looks to be only 40 years old, but could he actually be hundreds of years old? How could he tell such detailed stories, if he hadn’t been involved? (Geez, had those people never read fiction? “Oh, my! Hogwarts is described with such detail. JK Rowling must have been there! The wizarding world is real!”)

The Count also never said where he was from. This led to an awesome Leonard Nimoy moment. In all seriousness, with no hint of a snicker, but with that Spock eyebrow lift at the appropriate moment, Nimoy speculated, “But where was he actually from? Portugal? Egypt? (Cue eyebrow!) Atlantis?”

Sure. Atlantis. Why not? Why not Asgard? Frostbite Falls, MN? Ceti Alpha V??

Each show had the following disclaimer:

“This series presents information based in part on theory and conjecture. The producer’s purpose is to suggest some possible explanations, but not necessarily the only ones, to the mysteries we will examine.”

My skepticism has led me to giving that a little rewrite:

“This series presents information based mainly on guesses and lots and lots of conjecture. The producer’s purpose is to suggest some improbable explanations, but not necessarily the actual ones, to the mysteries we will monger.”

But, I still love it!

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Another Great Cover By Neal Adams

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Neal Adams once again makes an appearance in my great comic book covers series. Hey, it’s Neal Adams. He’s gonna have multiple entries. His artwork had a vibrancy and a sense of excitement that other DC Comics artists lacked. Sure, Curt Swan was a really good artist, but his stuff was kinda… dull.

Adams’ work was exciting. His characters were full of movement and life. He had a command of dynamic anatomy that few artists could match. In fact, Gil Kane might have been the only comic artist in those days who could surpass Adams in that regard.

The cover of Superman #237 (May 1971) isn’t flawless. That right leg of Superman’s seems a tad too enlarged and distorted. But look at those “zombies.” Each face has its own story behind it. I’m very curious as to what the story is with the kid “zombie” on the far right, at the front of the mob. What’s with the grey hair and the male pattern baldness? Why does he look so old? Is he a kid or an old little person? Curious.

The white outline around Superman is a good touch, as well. It separates our hero from the mob and makes it appear as though he is popping off the page. That’s something all comic artists strive for. And here Adams achieves it with a simple white outline.

It may not be Neal Adams’ best cover, but it’s still great.

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Bernie Wrightson – One Of The Masters

The world of comic books lost one incredible artist this past weekend. Bernie Wrightson, renown for his mastery of illustrating horror and the macabre, died too young at age 68 after a lengthy battle with brain cancer.

According to his obituary, he did take a correspondence course from the Famous Artists School, but otherwise he was largely self-taught through studying comic books. That astounds me. Well, some artists are just so good they don’t need that much in the way of formal training. I went to art school for three years and that made me a better artist, and I’m better today than I was right after my schooling, but I’d be flattering myself if I thought I could be a quarter as good an illustrator as Mr Wrightson.

Let’s look at some of his work.

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This witch illustration is the first image that comes to my mind when I think of Bernie Wrightson. He had a great sense of lighting in his work, which you can see here. He also could vary his inking technique to suggest different textures: flesh, hair, wood, the witch’s garment.

The next two examples show his brush technique in inking really well.

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I love the way the zombie’s tattered flesh, hair, and clothing flow downward into the ground as it emerges from its grave. And note how simply Wrightson renders the grave stones in the background and yet they still look so heavy.

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Probably Wrightson’s best known character, co-created with Len Wein, Swamp Thing is drawn here in such a way as to make him as much a part of nature as the tree behind him. He is a part of that swamp. Wrightson uses virtually the same texture when rendering Swamp Thing as he does with the tree.

Wrightson also worked in color. I’m including a piece from later in his career. It’s the cover for the third book of his Batman: The Cult series. The art within the books was good, but not quite at the same standard as his earlier work. However, the face of the bad guy being threatened by the Caped Crusader on this cover is fantastic!

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Finally, I’m including a piece from what must be considered Bernie Wrightson’s masterwork: his illustrated edition of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s Frankenstein. The artist worked on the 50 or so illustrations in this edition for about seven years. The quality is amazing. This one illustration demonstrates Wrightson’s brilliance with pen and ink. The textures and details he captures are incredible. There’s stone, wood, flesh, glass, cloth, water all in there and everything feels right.

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He masterfully directs the viewers’ eyes through that laboratory to the spot where Frankenstein’s creation demands to know why. Why did the doctor defy the will of God and bring him to life?

Bernie Wrightson was one of the masters and we can be thankful to have such a body of work to ponder and be humbled, amazed, and inspired by.

I’m feeling the itch to draw.

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1982 Gave Us These 10 Excellent Alternative (Mostly) Albums

Continuing with my look at excellent alternative albums from the days of yore (or from when I was young and kept up with what was going on), this week I’ll be listing ten albums released in 1982. I have previously covered 1979, 1980, 1985, and in one blog the combined years 1986-1989. Yes, I’m jumping around, but it keeps you on your toes.

Since I do only ten albums, there are years that some great releases are left off my list. I limit my choices to albums I know, so some really good albums don’t make the cut because I don’t know them well enough. For example, Devo released their fifth album – Oh, No! It’s Devo!– in 1982. I’m only familiar with three or four of the tracks, so it’s not on the list.

Enough preamble! On with the list.

As always, these are my choices. Your results may vary.

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10) Pleasure Victim – Berlin This EP didn’t make the cut initially, but Wikipedia goofed up and I had to replace an album on this list (see correction below). Good thing, too, because I really like this record, even if it might not be considered high art. It produced a minor hit for the group – Sex (I’m A…), before they exploded in popularity by having a song on some airplane movie soundtrack a couple years later. Very synthy and very catchy. And more than a little kitschy.

Favorite Track : The Metro

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9) The Gift – The Jam By the time The Jam, one of the UK’s most popular bands to emerge from the Punk/New Wave scene, recorded this their last album, their sound was far more ’60s Pop than the crashing drums, clanging guitar, and thumping bass of their first few releases. They were much more refined in the sound and, as it turned out, Paul Weller was ready to move on. As swan song albums go, this one is awfully good.

Favorite Track: Town Called Malice

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8) The Sky’s Gone Out – Bauhaus This third album by the Godfathers of Goth is my favorite by the band. There’s an excellent opening track which is a cover of Brian Eno’s Third Uncle and plenty of other dark and brooding tunes to be found. Spirit would have gotten the favorite track status, but I prefer the single version.

Favorite Track: All We Ever Wanted Was Everything

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7) All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes – Pete Townshend Of course, this entry explains the use of “mostly” in the headline. Townshend really can’t be considered alternative, but he’s my favorite songwriter, so he’s on the list. This album was more musically challenging than the more accessible Empty Glass (1980), Townshend’s most commercially successful solo effort. Among the more challenging songs such as The Sea Refuses No River, Stardom In Acton, and Exquisitely Bored can be found the pop gems Face Dances Pt2 and Stop Hurting People.

Favorite Track: Slit Skirts

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6) Chronic Town – REM This EP announced the arrival of a small college town band that would become superstars of rock by the end of the decade. Five tight, bouncy, jangly guitar-dominated tunes with mumbled lyrics are all that is offered, but it was enough to change the direction of alternative music for decades to come. It’s a landmark.

Favorite Track: Gardening At Night

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5) Peter Gabriel (Security) – Peter Gabriel Gabriel was still reluctant to name his albums, but this album was labeled Security when released in the States and in Canada. Whatever its name, it may be my favorite album by the former member of the UK prog band Genesis. My favorite track turned out to be a hit and the video of the song demonstrated that videos could be (should be) more than just featuring the artist miming the song in a faux concert performance. Videos could be (should be) art.

Favorite Track: Shock The Monkey

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4) Stink – The Replacements Another EP makes the list with the second release by the critic’s darlings from Minneapolis. Just eight blazingly quick tracks, none lasting more than three minutes and most under two, showcase the punk ethos of these rock ‘n’ rollers. There are glimpses of the more refined pop sound that would come with age and experience. For now the boys are still pretty hardcore.

Favorite Track: Kids Don’t Follow

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3) Combat Rock – The Clash Sure, this album made it to #7 on the US album charts and earned double platinum status also in the States, but The Clash were still a bunch of punk rockers. Joe Strummer went on walkabout and disappeared from the public eye for a time because he was overwhelmed by the band’s success. Well, it is a very good album that produced a couple of hits: Should I Stay Or Should I Go and Rock The Casbah.

Favorite Track: Know Your Rights

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2) English Settlement – XTC This was the last album XTC would record before the band stopped touring. It’s a transition album showing how the band was moving from the heavy guitar pop/rock with a little quirk thrown in to more lush productions. No Thugs In Our House is really the only rocker on this double album which is giving over to a more pop yet pastoral sound. Stand out tracks include Runaways, English Roundabout, Snowman, All Of A Sudden, and Jason And The Argonauts.

Favorite Track: Senses Working Overtime

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1) The Blurred Crusade – The Church This sophomore effort by Australia’s The Church might just be their best. The guitar playing is fantastic and Steve Kilbey’s vocals are mesmerizing. There is plenty of the ethereal atmosphere that was signature to the band’s sound included in the more rocking tunes (my favorite track is a good example). Almost With You is a great opening track and To Be In Your Eyes is one of my favorite loves songs of all time. The band would produce other terrific albums, but I don’t think they ever quite matched this one.

Favorite Track: You Took

Correction! 3-30-17: While preparing another 10 albums list, this time for 1983, I noticed Wikipedia had led me astray. I use Wikipedia to see which albums were released in a given year. When looking through the list of albums released in 1983, I saw that Wikipedia had the debut album by Violent Femmes on that year’s list – April 1983. But, they also had it on the 1982 list – November 1982. You can check for yourself.

Well, I had to fix that. Violent Femmes was released in 1983, so I’ve replaced it with Berlin’s second release – Pleasure Victim.

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An Unexpected Rabbit Hole

In January, the world was saddened by the news that Mary Tyler Moore had died. Lots of us had grown up watching her on TV, first as Laura Petrie on the Dick Van Dyke Show (1961-1966) and then as Mary Richards on the Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970-1977). And over the years she further impressed us with her many acting roles in television and in film. Most memorable for me was her performance as the cold and controlling, yet deeply wounded, mother and wife in Robert Redford’s Ordinary People (1980).

Her death has generated numerous tributes to her as a person and to her life and her work. And that’s what led me to a rabbit hole that took me on a rather interesting and, at times, frustrating journey of discovery. Not the discovery of my inning self and my emotions. I don’t have any of those.

No, it was a journey to discover just what is that line in the lyrics of Love Is All Around, the theme to the Mary Tyler Moore Show?!

For all these years, I had thought the lyrics to the chorus were:

“Love is all around, no need to waste it.
You can have this town, why don’t you take it?
You’re gonna make it after all.”

But last Friday morning, in the Bulletin Board (an online forum in which regular folks can tell stories, jokes, make observations, share pictures,etc) a contributor noted that a recent Nancy comic strip’s tribute to Mary had quoted, according this fellow, the lyrics wrong.

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The incorrect line was: “You can have a town, why don’t you take it?”

According to this Bulletin Boarder, the actual line is: “You can never tell, why don’t you take it?”

The person rather snarkily noted that people whose hearing was intact back then, and even now, could be certain it was “never tell,” not some line about having a (or in my case, this) town. In fact, the person noted, “I wish I’d kept track of how many tributes I’ve seen with the misheard version.”

Nearly 47 years and now this revelation? I was stunned!

However, I’m a skeptic, so I thought I better do some digging to see if I could verify this “never tell” claim. Thus began the journey of discovery.

You should be aware of a phenomenon known as priming. Priming can happen when a person is told what they should be able to hear when they listen to poor quality audio or even audio played backwards. Once you are told what to hear, it’s rather difficult, maybe even impossible, to not hear it. That’s priming.

And I found out that knowing about priming doesn’t protect you from falling victim to it.

In my search to determine the true lyrics, my first step was to look up the lyrics online. I found conflicting information. A couple websites had the “never tell” line, while others had versions of the “town” line. Hmm. However, one of the websites with the “never tell” line was the Boston Globe. They are a well-respected news source, so I started thinking I had been wrong about the “town” line. Or was I being primed?

Next I found several versions of the song on YouTube. The song was written and recorded by Sonny Curtis (not Paul Williams as some people have thought), who was a member of Buddy Holly’s Crickets and had been previously best known for writing the Bobby Fuller Four hit – I Fought The Law. Several of the versions I found were recorded by Curtis. There were two versions for the show: One for the first season and one for the rest of the series with some changed lyrics, but both versions retained the “never tell/town” line. Curtis also recorded two additional versions, which he released as singles, one in 1970 and the other in 1980. They still had the same lyrics to the disputed line, even though the instrumentation of the songs was different.

There are also several cover versions of the song. Sammy Davis Jr, Joan Jett, and, 80s punk band from St. Paul, Husker Du have all covered it. It’s not quite clear if it’s “never tell” or “town” on Sammy’s and Joan’s versions, but Husker Du clearly say “town.” In fact, they even sing it the way I’ve heard it as “this town” not “the town” or “a town.”

I was beginning to lean toward “never tell,” because I had put my faith in the Boston Globe‘s journalistic prowess, but I still wasn’t sure. It’s really hard to determine just what is the line.

Then it hit me! Sonny Curtis is still alive! At least according to Google. I found that he has a Facebook page and an official website. I couldn’t be certain he would get my messages, but I sent messages to both sources. I pleaded to him for an answer.

By the end of that Friday’s tumble down the rabbit hole, I received an email from the man himself. (Well, the email claimed it was him. I don’t want to go down another rabbit hole, so I’ll just accept that it was him.)

I’ll allow Mr Curtis to settle this once and for all.

“Hi Jim,

Thanks for your interest in the Mary Tyler Moore Theme.  Below with my compliments are the lyrics.

Mary Tyler Moore Theme
Words and Music by Sonny Curtis

Who can turn the world on with her smile
Who can take a nothing day and suddenly
make it all seem worthwhile

Well it’s you girl and you should know it
With each glance and every little movement
you show it

Chorus:

Love is all around no need to waste it
You can have the town why don’t you take it
You’re gonna make it after all

Published by Sony/ATV Music

Hope this is helpful.

All the best,
Sonny Curtis”

Very helpful! Thank you, Mr Curtis!

Oh! And, in your face! Mr Bulletin Boarder who thinks his hearing is so good!

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Another Month, Another Great Cover

One of my favorite parts of my job entering comic books into Nostalgia Zone‘s online catalog is getting to check out some pretty cool comic book covers. I get to see books that I might not have sought out, because they aren’t part of what I’m interested in in comic books. I was never a fan of Archie comics. The Harvey titles never did anything for me. I’m just not into funny comic books. I’m a Marvel Comics kid and I like superheroes.

I have a running list of great covers from our catalog, so I have plenty of material for this monthly series. And this time? Dude! It’s a Dell.

Dell Comics didn’t do much for me as a comic book collector either. They did some superhero stuff in their wide range of genres, but those superheroes were…kinda lame. Dell did many movie and television show adaptations, along with science fiction and ghost stories, Westerns and war stories. But they mostly did the funny stuff. They believed in the comic part of comic books.

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This month’s great cover (see above) comes from Dell Comics‘ Four Color series. Each month, in the Four Color series would be a different featured character or genre even. Dell would rotate these characters and genres, so one month you’d get a Zane Grey Western, the next month would be an Andy Panda story, then there would be Donald Duck, and the month after that would be Bugs Bunny. The characters and genres would rotate, so a few months later readers would get a new book with Donald Duck or Zane Grey, etc.

From comic books’ Golden Age (1938 – 1955), I present Dell Four Color #200 (October 1948) featuring Bugs Bunny, Super Sleuth. The artist was Ralph Heimdahl and his work is terrific. These old school comic book illustrators really were masters at inking. Look at the weight variation of Heimdahl’s line work. Very expressive and disciplined.

I like Bugs‘ pose and the look on his face. Normally, Bugs was super cool and in control, but there were times when he would be affected by fear. This cover is one of those times.

Bugs also feels as though he is in a place, a setting. There is a real feel to our hero standing on stairs and heading into a scary house. Most covers featuring cartoon characters such as Bugs are more character focused, with little or no background. This one deviates from those typical covers by giving Bugs a place to inhabit.

The composition is excellent. The rendering and dark coloring of the wall, stairs, and banisters, along with our hero’s expression and pose, give a feeling of mystery and danger. The motion lines at the bottom of the bright yellow door indicate Bugs is opening the door quickly so as to possibly catch someone in the act. Just what does he see inside that house?

It’s a great cover.

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