Tag Archives: The Jam

1982 Gave Us These 10 Excellent Alternative (Mostly) Albums

Continuing with my look at excellent alternative albums from the days of yore (or from when I was young and kept up with what was going on), this week I’ll be listing ten albums released in 1982. I have previously covered 1979, 1980, 1985, and in one blog the combined years 1986-1989. Yes, I’m jumping around, but it keeps you on your toes.

Since I do only ten albums, there are years that some great releases are left off my list. I limit my choices to albums I know, so some really good albums don’t make the cut because I don’t know them well enough. For example, Devo released their fifth album – Oh, No! It’s Devo!– in 1982. I’m only familiar with three or four of the tracks, so it’s not on the list.

Enough preamble! On with the list.

As always, these are my choices. Your results may vary.

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10) Pleasure Victim – Berlin This EP didn’t make the cut initially, but Wikipedia goofed up and I had to replace an album on this list (see correction below). Good thing, too, because I really like this record, even if it might not be considered high art. It produced a minor hit for the group – Sex (I’m A…), before they exploded in popularity by having a song on some airplane movie soundtrack a couple years later. Very synthy and very catchy. And more than a little kitschy.

Favorite Track : The Metro

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9) The Gift – The Jam By the time The Jam, one of the UK’s most popular bands to emerge from the Punk/New Wave scene, recorded this their last album, their sound was far more ’60s Pop than the crashing drums, clanging guitar, and thumping bass of their first few releases. They were much more refined in the sound and, as it turned out, Paul Weller was ready to move on. As swan song albums go, this one is awfully good.

Favorite Track: Town Called Malice

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8) The Sky’s Gone Out – Bauhaus This third album by the Godfathers of Goth is my favorite by the band. There’s an excellent opening track which is a cover of Brian Eno’s Third Uncle and plenty of other dark and brooding tunes to be found. Spirit would have gotten the favorite track status, but I prefer the single version.

Favorite Track: All We Ever Wanted Was Everything

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7) All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes – Pete Townshend Of course, this entry explains the use of “mostly” in the headline. Townshend really can’t be considered alternative, but he’s my favorite songwriter, so he’s on the list. This album was more musically challenging than the more accessible Empty Glass (1980), Townshend’s most commercially successful solo effort. Among the more challenging songs such as The Sea Refuses No River, Stardom In Acton, and Exquisitely Bored can be found the pop gems Face Dances Pt2 and Stop Hurting People.

Favorite Track: Slit Skirts

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6) Chronic Town – REM This EP announced the arrival of a small college town band that would become superstars of rock by the end of the decade. Five tight, bouncy, jangly guitar-dominated tunes with mumbled lyrics are all that is offered, but it was enough to change the direction of alternative music for decades to come. It’s a landmark.

Favorite Track: Gardening At Night

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5) Peter Gabriel (Security) – Peter Gabriel Gabriel was still reluctant to name his albums, but this album was labeled Security when released in the States and in Canada. Whatever its name, it may be my favorite album by the former member of the UK prog band Genesis. My favorite track turned out to be a hit and the video of the song demonstrated that videos could be (should be) more than just featuring the artist miming the song in a faux concert performance. Videos could be (should be) art.

Favorite Track: Shock The Monkey

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4) Stink – The Replacements Another EP makes the list with the second release by the critic’s darlings from Minneapolis. Just eight blazingly quick tracks, none lasting more than three minutes and most under two, showcase the punk ethos of these rock ‘n’ rollers. There are glimpses of the more refined pop sound that would come with age and experience. For now the boys are still pretty hardcore.

Favorite Track: Kids Don’t Follow

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3) Combat Rock – The Clash Sure, this album made it to #7 on the US album charts and earned double platinum status also in the States, but The Clash were still a bunch of punk rockers. Joe Strummer went on walkabout and disappeared from the public eye for a time because he was overwhelmed by the band’s success. Well, it is a very good album that produced a couple of hits: Should I Stay Or Should I Go and Rock The Casbah.

Favorite Track: Know Your Rights

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2) English Settlement – XTC This was the last album XTC would record before the band stopped touring. It’s a transition album showing how the band was moving from the heavy guitar pop/rock with a little quirk thrown in to more lush productions. No Thugs In Our House is really the only rocker on this double album which is giving over to a more pop yet pastoral sound. Stand out tracks include Runaways, English Roundabout, Snowman, All Of A Sudden, and Jason And The Argonauts.

Favorite Track: Senses Working Overtime

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1) The Blurred Crusade – The Church This sophomore effort by Australia’s The Church might just be their best. The guitar playing is fantastic and Steve Kilbey’s vocals are mesmerizing. There is plenty of the ethereal atmosphere that was signature to the band’s sound included in the more rocking tunes (my favorite track is a good example). Almost With You is a great opening track and To Be In Your Eyes is one of my favorite loves songs of all time. The band would produce other terrific albums, but I don’t think they ever quite matched this one.

Favorite Track: You Took

Correction! 3-30-17: While preparing another 10 albums list, this time for 1983, I noticed Wikipedia had led me astray. I use Wikipedia to see which albums were released in a given year. When looking through the list of albums released in 1983, I saw that Wikipedia had the debut album by Violent Femmes on that year’s list – April 1983. But, they also had it on the 1982 list – November 1982. You can check for yourself.

Well, I had to fix that. Violent Femmes was released in 1983, so I’ve replaced it with Berlin’s second release – Pleasure Victim.

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10 Excellent Alternative Albums From 1980…

I am continuing with my love of the alternative rock/pop music of my youth with the year 1980. 1980 was a pretty good year for alternative music, having so many excellent debut releases. In fact, half of this list is made up of first albums. You might disagree as to my rankings, but this is my list which, I admit, is completely subjective. Your results may vary.

So far, I’ve covered 1979 and 1985 each on their own. And I did a combo top ten pulled from the second half of the 1980s. Just in case you are keeping track.

Here’s my list for 1980:

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10) In Combo – The Suburbs Part of that first wave of punk, New Wave, DIY bands from the 80s’ alternative music capitol, Minneapolis, The Suburbs are difficult to categorize. Staccato guitars, throbbing basslines, cascading keyboards, driving drums and inscrutable lyrics fill this fantastically slamdanceable debut album. These guys were a blast to see play live.

Favorite track: Cows

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9) New Clear Days – The Vapors Thought by most to be a One Hit Wonder, which they pretty much are, The Vapors did produce plenty of catchy guitar-driven tunes on this their debut album. Of course, there’s their one hit – Turning Japanese – but there are a few other highlights including News At Ten, Spring Collection, and Sixty Second Interval.

Favorite track: Waiting For The Weekend

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8) Crocodiles – Echo & The Bunnymen This is the third debut album on my list so far and it also is pretty damn good. Hailing from The Beatles‘ hometown, Echo & the Bunnymen had a sound more akin to The Doors. But, don’t hold that against them. They could produce aggressive punk songs such as title track and more arty tracks as demonstrated by Villiers Terrace. And they could craft a mighty good pop song such as my favorite track on the album.

Favorite track: Rescue

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7) End Of The Century – Ramones This is the godfathers of punk meets the genius of Motown album. The original punk rockers teamed up with producer Phil Spector creating a more lush sounding version of their high-powered punk. Stand out tracks include Rock’n’Roll High School, Chinese Rock, and the cover of The Ronnettes classic Baby, I Love You.

Favorite track: Do You Remember Rock’n’Roll Radio?

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6) Remain In Light – Talking Heads Picked by Rolling Stone as one of the best albums of the decade, Remain In Light had Talking Heads teamed once again with producer Brian Eno. The band continued to explore African rhythms and worked with other musical artists including Nona Hendyrx, Adrian Belew, and Robert Palmer.

Favorite track: Once In A Lifetime

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5) Peter Gabriel (Melt) – Peter Gabriel On this, the third of his four self-titled albums (fans called this one Melt due to the album cover artwork), Gabriel continued to craft artful pop and rock songs, inching closer to the highly successful pop sound realized on his fifth solo album, So. Much like Talking Heads, Peter Gabriel brought in several talented musicians to help record this album, including Paul Weller, Dave Gregory, Robert Fripp, and, former Genesis bandmate, Phil Collins.

Favorite track: Games Without Frontiers

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4) Sound Affects – The Jam Intentionally spelled incorrectly to indicate the title is an action rather than a thing, this fifth release by the UK Mods introduced a funkier and heavier bass sound, as on Pretty Green and Start!, and a smattering of horns on the track Dream Time.

Favorite track: That’s Entertainment

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3) Pretenders – Pretenders Another fantastic debut album, one of the best ever, enters the list. Chrissie Hynde’s vocals and attitude were a breath of fresh air in the male dominated world of rock music. Tough (Precious, Tattooed Love Boys) and tender (Kid, Lovers Of Today) describe this album. Awesome also describes it.

Favorite track: Brass In Pocket

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2) Underwater Moonlight – The Soft Boys This band was introduced to me by a DJ spinning records for the radio station on the Beloit College campus. She told me and two of my friends as we watched her work that The Soft Boys were a brilliant band and that we had to check them out. She was right. Led by British surrealist rocker Robyn Hitchcock, this album is great from start to finish. Catchy tunes, soaring guitars, tight harmonies, and some pretty odd lyrics make this debut so irresistible.

Favorite track: Queen Of Eyes

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1) Black Sea – XTC It’s no secret this criminally underappreciated band from Swindon, England is one of my most favorite in all of rock/pop music. And this was the first album of theirs that I had ever heard. A harder, more straight forward rocking album than their previous releases, Black Sea still has loads of great hooks and pop melodies. The opening track Respectable Street was the first XTC song I ever heard and I loved it instantly. I cannot over-stress just how good I think this album is. It is well deserving of being number one on this list.

Favorite track: Towers Of London

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1979. A great year in alternative music.

Ever since I went to art school in the mid-80s, my musical tastes have favored the alternative stuff. And, at the time, I can remember friends of mine with a similar taste in music remarking on how many of our favorite albums came out in 1979. I’m not sure why it was such a good year for alternative music. Perhaps it was that the punk bands getting better at playing their instruments. I guess the world will never know, but so what?

I’ve compiled a top ten list of my favorite punk or post-punk or power pop punk (is there such a thing?) from that great year in music: 1979…

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10) Look Sharp! – Joe Jackson  It may have had a Top 40 hit with Is She Really Going Out With Him?, but Jackson’s punkish pop waves the alternative banner quite well. In 1990, when the thrash metal band Anthrax covered Got The Time a friend said that it surprised him that he liked it so much. I said, “Of course, you do. Joe Jackson wrote it!”

Favorite track: Got The Time

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9) Regatta de Blanc – The Police  This album did fairly well, reaching 25 on the US album chart, but I still consider the band to have been in the alt bin in 1979. I think their brand of punk-infused reggae or reggae-infused punk, whichever, is great. These guys might just make it.

Favorite track: Message In A Bottle

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8) The Specials – The Specials  Produced by Elvis Costello, this album of two-tone British ska is still awfully infectious. Who knew an album filled with songs about unemployment, bad marriages, underage pregnancy, awful tasting beer, and racism could be so much fun.

Favorite track: A Message to You, Rudy

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7) The Undertones – The Undertones  This is what I mean by power pop punk. This Irish punk band produced a debut album of one pogo-inducing song after another. I loved the first time I listened to it.

Favorite track: Get Over You

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6) London Calling – The Clash  I realize having this album by the “only band that matters” in the sixth spot in a top ten list may seem low, but just think how great the rest of the list will be. Even though this album was released in December 1979, Rolling Stone magazine declared it the greatest album of the 80s. Go figure. It is an excellent album that demonstrated punk was so much more than leather jackets, safety pins, and slam dancing.

Favorite track: London Calling

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5) Fear Of Music – Talking Heads  The punk rock of New York City was very different than that of the UK. It was more arty than political. Always artful, this album found Talking Heads beginning to expand their sound, taking on some of that World Music feel they would later cultivate. Depending on what day you might ask me, I usually consider this my favorite Talking Heads effort.

Favorite track: I Zimbra

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4) Entertainment! – Gang of Four  Another hell of a debut album makes this list. Andy Gill is on my list of favorite guitarists; his choppy, feedback-laden rhythm guitar is mesmerizing. The lyrics are challenging in their socialist, anti-capitalist ideals; and the music blends disco and punk seamlessly.

Favorite track: I Found That Essence Rare

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3) Setting Sons – The Jam  If I had to rank my all-time favorite bands The Jam would likely come in number three, behind The Who and XTC, respectively. Being a bit of a Mod myself in those days, The Jam really appealed to me and this is my favorite of their albums.

Favorite track: Thick As Thieves

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2) Drums And Wires – XTC  XTC is my second favorite band and they’re not number one on this list?! Yep. Did The Who release an album in 1979? Yes, but not a new studio album.

This is an excellent album, their first after keyboardist Barry Andrews left and guitarist Dave Gregory joined. The sound is notably different without Andrews’ maniac keyboard playing. But Gregory was able to expand their sound and point the band into a direction away from quirky pop to a more rock heavy sound and then, later, a more pastoral form of pop music.

Favorite track: Making Plans For Nigel

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1) A Different Kind of Tension – Buzzcocks  My goodness, but this is a great album! I hadn’t listened to it in a while, until just recently. And when I did listen to it again, I was blown away.

Buzzcocks are another example of what I call power pop punk. Their songs can be extremely catchy. Listening to this album again had the 25 year-old in me wishing the 51 year-old me could still skank and pogo the way I used to: To exhaustion when seeing this band in concert. The knees and the back just won’t allow it.

These songs are all very tight and driven by some excellent drumming. This album is as much about the drums as it is about the swirling, buzzing guitars and drummer John Maher scores big. The transition from the end of Mad, Mad Judy (with the fantastic closing line, “I’ve got all the answers!”) to Raison D’etre takes my breath away. It’s possibly the greatest such transition between two songs ever!

The album is simply relentless and, I my opinion, the best album of 1979.

Favorite track: The whole damn album!

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