Tag Archives: Pete Townshend

The Start of My Greatest Love of 35 Years

Writer’s note: Pulled from the archives of my personal blog at dimland.com, comes this story of my discovering my favorite band. Look. It’s been since July since I’ve written anything Who related. I was having withdrawal symptoms. OK? The following has been revised and updated, but the song remains the same. Song remains the same? That’s Led Zeppelin. We’re not talking about them.

82-The_Who-PP-011-The_Who

Press photo from thewho.info

This was a life changing concert for me. I know that sounds dramatic, but it is true. Seeing this show got me big into The Who and that led me to punk rock which led me to even more interesting and varied styles of music. In those days, I was listening to mostly crap. Journey, Styx, Foreigner, Boston, yuck! (Although, I must admit I have a soft spot for a lot of that crap today.) The Who changed that.

I wasn’t much of a Who fan at the time. I knew the band existed. I knew a few of their songs. (It turns out I knew quite a few, actually.) I knew Pete Townshend had some solo stuff out. I liked their new single Athena which was getting some radio play. At best, I thought they were OK and not much else.

I think I was aware the band would be in town that October weekend 35 years ago. I was even in downtown St. Paul the afternoon of the day of the first show of a two day stop in Minnesota. In fact, I had been right there by the St. Paul Civic Center where the concerts were going to be held. I had been downtown to pick up my comic books from a little comic shop that was less than a block away from where rock greatness would be experienced by fans that night and the next.

Civic_Center-2_large

Of course, I had no plans to attend either of the concerts. I had only been to one concert before and hadn’t yet been bitten by any kind of music bug.

My bus stop was located directly in front of the Civic Center (now the site of the Xcel Center, home of the Minnesota Wild). I have a vague recollection of seeing The Who’s name listed on the marquee.

My bus arrived to take me home. I took my seat, not giving the world’s greatest rock band a second thought. A couple stops later and on hopped a young pothead and a few of his friends, also potheads. I knew that young pothead, he and I worked together back then.

He spotted me.

“Hey, man! Are you going to The Who concert tonight?”

“Uh, no. I’ll be reading my comic books when I get home.”

“Dude! Really?! Aw, man!”

“Sorry.”

When I got home, my mom had an urgent message from my friend John. I was to call him right away!

John had bought three tickets to that night’s show. He had no one to go with. Why he bought three John doesn’t even know. He was able to get a mutual friend on board, but he needed a third. Luckily, he didn’t find anyone else before I was able to call him back.

I made a quick call to work to let them know I might be a little late. I worked the graveyard shift on the weekends and it was always very slow the first hour or so of the shift. The boss said it would be no problem. After all, this was The Who’s North American Farewell Tour, I was willing to risk being a little late, because they would never tour again. Right?

It was on this tour that The Clash opened for The Who at Shea Stadium in New York City. We didn’t get The Clash. We got T-Bone Burnett. We had no idea who he was. He was kinda weird. He did a guitar solo consisting of him plucking one note at one part of the stage, then walking to another part of the stage to pluck another note. He did several notes that way. We weren’t really digging this guy and his band. John and I have talked about being disappointed that we didn’t get The Clash at our show. Burnett would go on to be better know as a record producer and for his work in film scores and soundtracks. At the time, though, it was, “Who is this guy?”

I did learn in doing research for this blog that it is very likely Mick Ronson was part of Burnett’s band. Ronson played guitar for David Bowie in the Ziggy Stardust era. So it turns out the headliners weren’t the only legends we saw that night. We just didn’t know it.

Speaking of legends, there was that headlining act: The greatest rock ‘n’ roll band in the world – The Who. This was supposed to be their last tour. Despite the band’s impending retirement, they did have a new album to promote. The album was It’s Hard. Not a perfect album. It’s no Quadrophenia or Who’s Next. And it lacks the maniacal spontaneity of the late Keith Moon on drums, but it’s not as bad as it is said to be.

The show was loud. Very loud! Possibly the loudest concert I have ever attended. At least, one of the loudest. It certainly was the loudest then, but it was also only the second concert I had been to. It was a sold out show packed with boisterous Who fans. I couldn’t help but get caught up in the euphoria of the event. I found myself cheering and whistling as loud as I could. And I was cheering for Pete Townshend in particular. I can’t explain (wink) why, but I felt a connection to Townshend form that night and it has never broken.

They played most of their biggest hits (all of which I knew – much to my surprise) and a few songs from their new album. They didn’t play Athena or any of Pete’s solo stuff. I had wondered if they might. They did close the with a cover of Twist & Shout, which most people remember as a Beatles song, but their version was a cover as well. Also, this tour had Roger Daltrey playing guitar on a few numbers, most notable was Eminence Front. He hadn’t played guitar with the band since before he took over as lead singer way back when they were called The Detours.

maxresdefault

Their light show featured three sets of spotlights. One set on either side of the stage and one at the back of the main floor. Aimed straight up, each set of three spotlights would twirl around and open and close, casting bright white beams of light to the heavens… Well, the ceiling anyway.

Another fun feature of the show was the glow sticks that were sold to fans. People starting tossing the green glowing objects high over the crowd. They looked pretty cool as they sailed overhead. Then someone had the brilliant idea to take a lighter (a must fan item at concerts) and melt a hole in the plastic, then hurl the now leaking tube into the air. Cascading down were all these green glowing droplets. So fun!

The whole event was the talk of the school on Monday and my life had changed. I became obsessed with The Who and Pete Townshend. I bought all their albums and bought and read books about them and their history. I was all about The Who from then on.

And it all began on October 2, 1982, because a friend had an extra ticket.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Advertisements
Tagged , , ,

1982 Gave Us These 10 Excellent Alternative (Mostly) Albums

Continuing with my look at excellent alternative albums from the days of yore (or from when I was young and kept up with what was going on), this week I’ll be listing ten albums released in 1982. I have previously covered 1979, 1980, 1985, and in one blog the combined years 1986-1989. Yes, I’m jumping around, but it keeps you on your toes.

Since I do only ten albums, there are years that some great releases are left off my list. I limit my choices to albums I know, so some really good albums don’t make the cut because I don’t know them well enough. For example, Devo released their fifth album – Oh, No! It’s Devo!– in 1982. I’m only familiar with three or four of the tracks, so it’s not on the list.

Enough preamble! On with the list.

As always, these are my choices. Your results may vary.

Berlin_pleasure

10) Pleasure Victim – Berlin This EP didn’t make the cut initially, but Wikipedia goofed up and I had to replace an album on this list (see correction below). Good thing, too, because I really like this record, even if it might not be considered high art. It produced a minor hit for the group – Sex (I’m A…), before they exploded in popularity by having a song on some airplane movie soundtrack a couple years later. Very synthy and very catchy. And more than a little kitschy.

Favorite Track : The Metro

The_Jam's_The_Gift

9) The Gift – The Jam By the time The Jam, one of the UK’s most popular bands to emerge from the Punk/New Wave scene, recorded this their last album, their sound was far more ’60s Pop than the crashing drums, clanging guitar, and thumping bass of their first few releases. They were much more refined in the sound and, as it turned out, Paul Weller was ready to move on. As swan song albums go, this one is awfully good.

Favorite Track: Town Called Malice

2700098

8) The Sky’s Gone Out – Bauhaus This third album by the Godfathers of Goth is my favorite by the band. There’s an excellent opening track which is a cover of Brian Eno’s Third Uncle and plenty of other dark and brooding tunes to be found. Spirit would have gotten the favorite track status, but I prefer the single version.

Favorite Track: All We Ever Wanted Was Everything

R-2311147-1300842753.jpeg

7) All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes – Pete Townshend Of course, this entry explains the use of “mostly” in the headline. Townshend really can’t be considered alternative, but he’s my favorite songwriter, so he’s on the list. This album was more musically challenging than the more accessible Empty Glass (1980), Townshend’s most commercially successful solo effort. Among the more challenging songs such as The Sea Refuses No River, Stardom In Acton, and Exquisitely Bored can be found the pop gems Face Dances Pt2 and Stop Hurting People.

Favorite Track: Slit Skirts

R.E.M._-_Chronic_Town

6) Chronic Town – REM This EP announced the arrival of a small college town band that would become superstars of rock by the end of the decade. Five tight, bouncy, jangly guitar-dominated tunes with mumbled lyrics are all that is offered, but it was enough to change the direction of alternative music for decades to come. It’s a landmark.

Favorite Track: Gardening At Night

R-449231-1276029385.jpeg

5) Peter Gabriel (Security) – Peter Gabriel Gabriel was still reluctant to name his albums, but this album was labeled Security when released in the States and in Canada. Whatever its name, it may be my favorite album by the former member of the UK prog band Genesis. My favorite track turned out to be a hit and the video of the song demonstrated that videos could be (should be) more than just featuring the artist miming the song in a faux concert performance. Videos could be (should be) art.

Favorite Track: Shock The Monkey

R-1336113-1343943606-4467.jpeg

4) Stink – The Replacements Another EP makes the list with the second release by the critic’s darlings from Minneapolis. Just eight blazingly quick tracks, none lasting more than three minutes and most under two, showcase the punk ethos of these rock ‘n’ rollers. There are glimpses of the more refined pop sound that would come with age and experience. For now the boys are still pretty hardcore.

Favorite Track: Kids Don’t Follow

The_Clash_-_Combat_Rock

3) Combat Rock – The Clash Sure, this album made it to #7 on the US album charts and earned double platinum status also in the States, but The Clash were still a bunch of punk rockers. Joe Strummer went on walkabout and disappeared from the public eye for a time because he was overwhelmed by the band’s success. Well, it is a very good album that produced a couple of hits: Should I Stay Or Should I Go and Rock The Casbah.

Favorite Track: Know Your Rights

xtc_english_settlement

2) English Settlement – XTC This was the last album XTC would record before the band stopped touring. It’s a transition album showing how the band was moving from the heavy guitar pop/rock with a little quirk thrown in to more lush productions. No Thugs In Our House is really the only rocker on this double album which is giving over to a more pop yet pastoral sound. Stand out tracks include Runaways, English Roundabout, Snowman, All Of A Sudden, and Jason And The Argonauts.

Favorite Track: Senses Working Overtime

22923-the-blurred-crusade

1) The Blurred Crusade – The Church This sophomore effort by Australia’s The Church might just be their best. The guitar playing is fantastic and Steve Kilbey’s vocals are mesmerizing. There is plenty of the ethereal atmosphere that was signature to the band’s sound included in the more rocking tunes (my favorite track is a good example). Almost With You is a great opening track and To Be In Your Eyes is one of my favorite loves songs of all time. The band would produce other terrific albums, but I don’t think they ever quite matched this one.

Favorite Track: You Took

Correction! 3-30-17: While preparing another 10 albums list, this time for 1983, I noticed Wikipedia had led me astray. I use Wikipedia to see which albums were released in a given year. When looking through the list of albums released in 1983, I saw that Wikipedia had the debut album by Violent Femmes on that year’s list – April 1983. But, they also had it on the 1982 list – November 1982. You can check for yourself.

Well, I had to fix that. Violent Femmes was released in 1983, so I’ve replaced it with Berlin’s second release – Pleasure Victim.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

1985. A Great Year in (Mostly) Alternative Music

Last month, I looked at the year 1979 as it pertained to alternative music. The reason was that I noticed that 1979 saw a lot of really good alternative music albums being released.

The inspiration for this blog came about because I periodically guest blog on the Stuck in the 80s blog. My main contributions to that blog is to profile musical artists of the alternative scene in the 80s. These artists did not chart on the Top 40 Pop charts in America. A wider audience was, for some reason, denied them, so I dubbed them to be Never Found in the 80s. And I was looking at my list of artists that I have yet to write about. I realized the songs I picked to post with the write ups were very often from 1985. So, I thought, “Why not do my Top Ten of alternative albums for the year 1985?” I couldn’t think of a reason not to, so here it is…

(Oh, one of the albums isn’t exactly alternative, but I like it, so what are ya gonna do?)

Wishing_Chair

10) The Wishing Chair – 10,000 Maniacs  I was reading an interview of REM‘s Michael Stipe in those mid-80s days and in it he was asked if there was anything interesting he was listening to at that time. One of the bands he mentioned was 10,000 Maniacs. And just on that recommendation I picked up this their debut album and I discovered an excellent folksy rock album with the terrific lead vocals of Natalie Merchant.

Favorite track: Scorpio Rising

MeatMurder

9) Meat Is Murder – The Smiths  Aside from the unlistenable, preachy, veganny title track, this is a solid album by the quintessential 80s alt band. The American release included the awesome How Soon Is Now? making it damn near perfect, except for that “cows are beautiful, so eating them is murder” track. Eh, I’m a meat eater, perhaps I’m wrong and Morrissey is right.

Favorite track: What She Said

-Our+Favourite+Shop-+-Socialist-+-Style+council-

8) Our Favourite Shop – The Style Council  This is former front man of UK’s The Jam Paul Weller and Mick Talbot’s second full length album as The Style Council and it is my favorite. Heavily socialist in its message, it was the band’s most successful release, earning gold record status in the UK. (I sure hope they didn’t feel guilty about all the money it earned.) In the states, this album was released with different cover art and song order and was called Internationalists.

Favorite track: Boy Who Cried Wolf

homepage_large.c45d0afa

7) The Head on the Door – The Cure  This was the sixth album by these moody Goth rockers and it has some awfully cool songs. I love the great thumping bass open of the song Screw. This was also The Cure’s first album to crack the US Top 100 Album chart. It reached 59. Even greater charting success was yet to come.

Favorite track: In Between Days

Killing_Joke_night_time

6) Night Time – Killing Joke  So far this list has been pretty sensitive and, perhaps, a bit on the navel gazing side, but that changes with this album by UK post punkers Killing Joke. Intense is a good word to describe this band, especially front man Jaz Coleman. The album is an ass kicker.

Favorite track: Eighties

R.E.M._-_Fables_of_the_Reconstruction

5) Fables of the Reconstruction – REM  This was REM’s third full length album and it was becoming clear that these guys might get some traction on the charts. Stipe’s vocals were also becoming clearer. He was muttering and mumbling less on this album than on their previous efforts. And there was the welcome addition of horns. Horns almost always boost a song to greatness.

Favorite track: Can’t Get There From Here

09

4) New Day Rising – Husker Du  Hardcore punk with harmonies and a do it yourself attitude pretty much describes this band out of St. Paul, MN. Released just six months after their magnum opus Zen Arcade, New Day Rising continued their buzzing feedback screech with tight catchy melodies that had some people taking notice. And if this wasn’t enough material for fans, the boys would release Flip Your Wig in a mere eight months.

Favorite track: Celebrated Summer

The_Replacements_-_Tim_cover

3) Tim – The Replacements  Critics’ darlings from Minneapolis were on the verge of breaking it big (but the band themselves made sure that didn’t happen) with this their first release on a major label. It is a more cleanly produced (by the late Tommy Erdeyli, formerly Tommy Ramone original member of The Ramones) than their previous records and, perhaps, less appealing to their hardcore fans. But, I think it is a fine album, which contains one of Paul Westerberg’s best songs (see my favorite track).

Favorite track: Here Comes A Regular

41F6Y7BVJAL

2) White City: A Novel – Pete Townshend  Yeah, this is the one I warned you about. It’s not quite an alternative album, but I really like it and Townshend is my all time favorite songwriter, so on the list it goes. It has all that Townshend pretentious goodness (the album is being called a novel?) and some great songs. Not his best solo album, but pretty damn close!

Favorite track: Give Blood

SUZANNE

1) Suzanne Vega – Suzanna Vega  I don’t know what it is about this album, but it is one of my very most favorite albums of all time. OK, this may also not be what people think of when they think of alternative music, but its folksy simplicity and directness certainly set it apart from everything else in 1985. This album must have come to my attention at the right time of my life that it has come to be so important to me. Vega continued to create great music, but nothing ever came up to this one’s level. At least, in my eyes. I just love this album.

Favorite track: Marlene on the Wall

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Join together with the band…one last time.

dsc_8782

Photo credit: Steve Cohen/CityPages

It was a long time coming.

The tickets for the Minneapolis stop of the North American leg of The Who Hits 50 Tour went on sale in October 2014. That meant it would be a yearlong wait for the rock legends to take the stage at Target Center (home of perennial NBA loser MN Timberwolves and perennial WNBA world champion MN Lynx) in October 2015. But, seeing as how this was likely going to be the last time my rock heroes would play in my town; Roger Daltrey, lead vocalist, had called the tour the “long goodbye”, I had to buy tickets and gird myself for the wait.

The wait got longer when in September 2015 it was announced that the tour was on hold due to Daltrey being hospitalized to be treated for viral meningitis. Fortunately, he recovered and the tour resumed in the spring of this year.

May 1st. Finally, the day had arrived. My wife and I and 10,000 plus Who fans would be treated to two hours of some of The Who’s greatest hits. Daltrey and Pete Townshend, songwriter and lead guitarist, took the stage joining the six other members of the now eight-member touring band. Townshend, sometimes taciturn when performing, actually skipped his way into the spotlight.

The rest of the band included Simon Townshend (Pete’s brother) on guitar and backing vocals and Zak Starkey (Ringo Starr’s son) on drums. Those two have been members of The Who since 1996. That means Starkey has been the band’s drummer longer than the original drummer Keith Moon. Pino Palladino continued his role, taken on in 2002 after the death of John Entwistle, as bass player. The other musicians were Loren Gold, John Corey, and Frank Simes, all playing keyboards and various other instruments and providing backing vocals. Simes is also the musical director for the tour.

Kicking off with one of their late 70s hits Who Are You which was followed by The Seeker, had this Who fan swallowing back quite a sizable lump in my throat. “This is it,” I thought to myself, “I’m never seeing these guys in concert again.”

I pulled myself together and witnessed these living legends rock the house with such classics as My Generation, The Kids Are Alright, Behind Blue Eyes, Bargain, You Better You Bet, and Eminence Front.

There was a chunk from their pioneering rock opera Tommy (1969): Amazing Journey, Sparks, Pinball Wizard, and See Me, Feel Me. That was preceded by a chunk from their 1973 masterpiece Quadrophenia: I’m One (to which I damn near lost it), The Rock (this instrumental track was the highlight of the night), and Love Reign O’er Me.

There were also a few songs the boys don’t normally play in concert: I Can See for Miles, Pictures of Lily, and the excellent Join Together. I had forgotten how great that song is! And many of the songs that night were introduced by either Daltrey or Townshend with explanations on their meaning or how they were written.

Also throughout the show were projected images on the big screen behind the band. For most of the first half of the show the images were of The Who in their early days. Images of Moon’s lunacy and Entwistle’s rock steadiness paid tribute to those absent original members.

While Daltrey’s voice may have lost some of his former range, I thought it was better than when I saw the band in 2002. However, from what I’ve read in other reviews, it is Daltrey’s voice that has garnered the negative criticism. Well, you try pushing your voice to its limits for the better part of 50 years, and let’s see how well it holds up. I thought he sounded pretty good.

Townshend was a monster! He played with the same ferocity he had when he was half his nearly 71 years of age. The leaps and stage slides may have long gone by the wayside, but his playing was at its windmilling best!

They capped off the night with their two biggest anthems, both from their most commercially successful album Who’s Next (1971): Baba O’Riley and Won’t Get Fooled Again. Incidentally, Daltrey nailed that scream at the end of Won’t Get Fooled Again, proving he could still do it. Take that, critics!*

However, by the end, the old fellas were drained, but seemed to have really enjoyed themselves performing for us. The crowd, also feeling drained, graciously accepted the band’s thank you’s and goodbye’s. No encore. The lights went up and we made our way home.

I cannot overstate what this band means to me. I’m so glad I have been able to see them one last time.

My only complaint is that they didn’t play longer.

“Rock is dead they say, LONG LIVE ROCK!” ~ Pete Townshend

*Update 5/13/16: As much as it pains me to say so, it appears Roger didn’t nail that scream. I was quite surprised when he hit it when I was at the show, due to the lessening of his vocal range, but I wanted to give him credit. However, it was nagging at me. Was it live or was it Memorex?

I found video of the entire concert. It’s not the best quality, but it’s the whole show. At the 1:55:18 mark is the scream. It’s not clear if he is lip syncing. However, there is another video from the same tour in June of last year of the boys playing Won’t Get Fooled Again. At the 9:09 mark he doesn’t quite get the scream synced up right. He didn’t have the microphone near his mouth when the scream starts and he begins to close his mouth before it ends. Plus that scream from June 28, 2015 sounds like the exact same scream from May 1, 2016 to me.

Oh, well. He is 72. I guess I’m OK with being fooled this one time.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share!

Tagged , , ,

The Who Ranked By Me!

Whenever I’m involved in the age old debate as to which was the better rock band: The Beatles or The Rolling Stones? My answer is always the same, “That’s easy! The Who.”

yJg4Nq8V

Since October 2, 1982, the night I saw The Who in concert for the first time, I have viewed the world through Who-colored glasses. They are my favorite band of all time. And Pete Townshend is my favorite songwriter, singer, and guitarist of all time. Hence my answer to that debate.

The Who have turned 50 recently and, to celebrate that achievement, they’ve released another “best of” compilation and have embarked on a North American tour. (The tour is on hold until Spring 2016, due to Roger Daltrey having a wee bit of the viral meningitis. We’re told he is doing well, but needs to rest a while before resuming the grueling task of performing live in front of thousands of adoring fans, of which, this coming May, I will be one.)

The British music magazine NME recently ranked the ten best albums by The Who. That struck me as odd, because The Who released a total of 11 studio albums, so why not rank them all? You know, this list goes to 11. Get it?

However, their list would have to go to 12, if they had featured them all, because they included the band’s seminal live album Live At Leeds (1970).

These kind of lists can’t help but be a little controversial. Not everyone will agree with the ranking choices. (Really, NME? Tommy number one? How pedestrian.) My listing will probably do the same for other Who fans, but it’s my list so I get to pick ’em!

I will include Live At Leeds, but none of the many, many compilations the band has released over the years. Most notable among them are Meaty, Beaty, Big & Bouncy (1971) and Odds And Sods (1974). Both are excellent, but I will not include them here.

So here it is: My ranking of the albums released by the Greatest Rock Band in the World!

12) Endless Wire (2006): This album feels more like a Townshend solo project with Daltrey doing most of the singing. With John Entwistle not being involved due to a wee bit of a case of death, this feels less like The Who than their early 80s, post Keith Moon albums. It does have plenty of good stuff on it though. ‘Black Widow’s Eyes’, “God Speaks Marty Robbins’, ‘We Got A Hit’ are all very good. Roger’s voice has aged, but Pete’s seems ageless. Maybe it’s just me.

My favorite track: ‘Endless Wire (Extended)’

11) It’s Hard (1982): This and Face Dances were criticized unfairly. Yes, the manic drumming of Moon was replaced by the steadier beat of Kenney Jones, but Townshend was still churning out some great tunes. Daltrey’s voice was in excellent shape and Entwistle’s writing contributions were very good. ‘Athena’, ‘Dangerous’, ‘One At A Time’, and ‘Cry If You Want’ all make this album an enjoyable, if uneven, listen.

My favorite track: ‘Eminence Front’

10) Face Dances (1981): Fans probably weren’t sure what to expect with this first album since Moon’s untimely death, but the opening track, for me, is one of the best of The Who’s albums’ lead off songs. Still a bit uneven, but I think it’s much better than some critics were willing to admit. ‘The Quiet One’, ‘Daily Records’, and ‘Another Tricky Day’ are all stand outs.

My favorite track: ‘You Better You Bet’

9) My Generation (1965): The title track was the song that made it likely that if The Who had never produced another song, they would still be remembered as making one of the strongest, angriest, spit-in-the-facest songs ever recorded. The rest of this debut album demonstrates The Who’s early maximum R & B sound. Aside from the title track there are a few other gems worth checking out including ‘The Good’s Gone’, ‘A Legal Matter’, and the driving instrumental ‘The Ox’.

My favorite track: ‘The Kids Are Alright’

8) Who Are You (1978): This was to be the last of the “real” Who albums, and for me it feels a bit disjointed. The title track was written after a drunken encounter by Townshend with members of the Sex Pistols. At the time, Townshend was a great fan of Punk Rock as he felt that the kids could now take care of Rock’n’Roll while he could explore different ideas in music. He did that on this and future albums. Some of the songs play almost as Broadway theater fare. Stand out tracks are ‘Had Enough’, ‘Sister Disco’, and, of course, the title track.

My favorite track: ‘905’

7) A Quick One (1966): This was The Who’s second album and their label thought that since The Beatles were writing all their own songs The Who should, too. They asked that each band member write two songs for their new release. Townshend and Entwistle had the gift, but Moon and Daltrey weren’t quite ready. (Roger only managed one and that was with Pete’s help.) The result is slightly uneven, but there is some nice stuff on here. ‘Run Run Run’, ‘Boris The Spider’, ‘Cobwebs And Strange’ and ‘A Quick One, While He’s Away’ are very satisfying. The song ‘A Quick One, While He’s Away’ is a nine minute track that is made up of separate parts and helped lay the groundwork for Tommy.

My favorite track: ‘Sad So About Us’

6) The Who Sell Out (1967): One of the first concept albums in rock music, Townshend’s idea was to link the songs together as though this was all part of a pirate radio station’s playlist. There are commercials and announcements woven in between the tracks with some of the tracks themselves being commercials. The concept tails off in the second half of the album which includes the song ‘Rael’. That song has many musical elements that Townshend would later use on Tommy. Some of the best tracks are ‘Mary Anne With The Shaky Hands’, ‘Tattoo’, ‘I Can’t Reach You’, and ‘Sunrise’. I recommend getting the deluxe version of this album as it pulls off the concept more thoroughly than the original release.

My favorite track: ‘I Can See For Miles’

5) Tommy (1969): This was the release that made the band rock superstars and finally got them out from under the debt accumulated from all that instrument smashing. The album sounds a little under-produced, but it’s the under-produced nature of this album that made it more suitable to be played live. The story of Tommy (a blind, deaf, and dumb boy) is meant to take the listener on a spiritual journey. I’m not sure it worked out that way, but with such tracks as ‘Christmas’, ‘The Acid Queen’, ‘Go To The Mirror!’, ‘I’m Free’ and ‘We’re Not Gonna Take It’, Tommy became a landmark album.

My favorite track: ‘Pinball Wizard’

4) Live At Leeds (1970): This is the best live album I have ever heard! The Who are at their height of musical exploration. The track for their song ‘My Generation’ lasts nearly 15 minutes as Townshend wends his way through a monster guitar solo. The original release contained a mere six songs, but it managed to show the world this is what a live rock album should be. Half of the songs are covers including ‘Young Man Blues’ and ‘Shaking All Over’. Again, I recommend getting the deluxe version. It has much, much more! Plus it gives the listener a chance to hear the band members bantering with each other as they introduce the next song to be played. Damn! I wish I could have seen them then.

My favorite track: ‘Summertime Blues’

3) The Who By Numbers (1975): This is kind of the forgotten Who album, but I think it is outstanding. Much less ambitious that all those concept albums and rock operas that had gone before, this collection of songs finds The Who a bit quieter and coming to terms with getting older. At the time, there were some who worried this might be a sort of suicide note from Pete. Apparently, they didn’t listen much to the uplifting ‘Blue, Red, and Grey’. Lots of good stuff on here including ‘Slip Kid’, ‘Squeeze Box’, and ‘Success Story’ (a great Entwistle tune). Let’s try to remember this one, OK?

My favorite track: ‘However Much I Booze’

2) Who’s Next (1971): This album was the leftovers from Townshend’s very ambitious and confusing project Lifehouse. The project sent Pete into an emotional spiral and it had to be put off. (Pete has never completely given up on it, though.) So, Who’s Next was put together. And, wow! These are leftovers? Townshend’s early embracing of synthesizers led to their greatest opening track ever! This album is full of great rock moments. ‘Bargain’, ‘My Wife’, ‘Behind Blue Eyes’, and ‘Won’t Get Fooled Again’ all became staples of rock radio.

My favorite track: ‘Baba O’Riley’ (Still gives me goosebumps!)

1) Quadrophenia (1973): Tommy be damned! This is The Who’s greatest album! Completely composed by Townshend, this brilliant album has helped a lot of young people deal with the awkward times of their lives when they just didn’t know who the f@#k they were. As a concept album, Quadrophenia is the most fully realized effort by The Who. There was some criticism that the album was over-produced, but that doesn’t matter to me or the many, many other Who fans who pick this one as their favorite. Its stand out songs include ‘The Real Me’, ‘I’m One’, ‘I’ve Had Enough’, ‘5:15’, and ‘Love Reign O’er Me’. This is an album that must be listened to from beginning to end.

My favorite track: ‘Drowned’

the-who-4df32b9d47907

50 years of The Who. Not too shabby.

Tagged , , , , ,