Tag Archives: PBS

I Didn’t Like Curious George

Note: This is another post pulled from my blog at dimland.com. It has been updated, revised, and corrected. And, yes, I know George is a chimpanzee. It’s just more fun to say monkey.
Back before my 13 year-old son had attained school age, like most parents, I ended up watching plenty of children’s programming with him. Programming I would otherwise never watch. I know it’s for kids. And I know anything is possible in cartoonland, but some of the stuff he watched really drove me crazy.
My wife and I had our son watch the children’s’ programming available on PBS and a few of the shows were pretty good. I liked Fetch, Arthur, and, especially, Word Girl. Word Girl was particularly good because the producers realized that adults would be watching with their kids, so why not entertain them, too?
There was one program, however, that consistently got under my skin. It was Curious George. What world does this monkey live in? Believe me, I would try to suspend my disbelief, but it got so difficult when George caused so much damage. He flooded the apartment building he lived in, he stole the other tenants’ recyclable containers before the items had even been used, he splashed paint all over an empty apartment. And he never got in trouble! The Man in the Yellow Hat, George’s owner, must have been worth millions or had quite the insurance policy to cover all the damage his monkey did.

In the show, people don’t realize George is a monkey. Well, they do, but they treat him as though he is human. In one rather excruciating episode, George finds himself in a department store that has a candy counter run by an incredibly stupid woman. Naturally, she and George hit it off.

By the way, Mr. Yellow Hat is constantly leaving George on his own, even though he should know that any time George is left alone, mayhem ensues.

Well, the candy counter owner realizes that she’s running low on inventory, so she leaves George (a monkey!) in charge and traipses off, in the middle of the day, to get more candy. Shouldn’t she have realized she was running low on inventory earlier? Can’t she temporarily close the candy counter? Can’t she have the candy delivered?

Nope, she leaves the monkey in charge.

What had been a slow day at the candy counter suddenly becomes very busy, now that the human has left. Do any of the customers find it unusual that there is a monkey waiting on them? Do any of them consider that the monkey, being a monkey, may have difficulty comprehending their orders? Of course not!

George makes a huge mess of the candy counter and ends up giving away almost all the candy. Somehow the moronic humans thought he was giving away free samples. But what was George to do? He’s a monkey.

The numbskull candy seller finally returns. She sees her station in shambles and realizes that George (a monkey!) had given away so many free samples that, even if she sells all that is left, she won’t be able to afford new inventory. She’ll have to go out of business.

George is sorry and says something in monkey language. I think it translates to, “What did you expect, dumbass? You left your business in the care of a monkey!”

This is PBS cartoonland, after all, so nothing really bad happens. Somehow, despite her certainty of bankruptcy, she gets so many new customers, because of George giving away all those free samples, that she stays in business. I don’t know how she managed that. She said she wouldn’t be able to stay in business even if she sold all of the candy, so what gives? Were her new customers big tippers? Talk about voodoo economics.

Thinking back on those cartoons, one of the biggest problems I had with the PBS kids’ shows was the fact that no one ever really gets in trouble. With the exception of Arthur, on which the kids get grounded or some other consequence for carelessness or bad behavior, PBS cartoon characters are always just forgiven when they say they’re sorry. “Oh, that’s OK. It was an accident.”

My wife said that she thought PBS was more concerned that kids understand they should apologize for mistakes or bad behavior. I agree that is important, but it’s also important that kids learn that careless or bad behavior may result in loss of privileges or trust. Why adjust your behavior if all you have to do is say sorry and all is forgiven?

But, in Curious George’s case, what can you do? He’s a monkey!

curious-george
Packing Peanuts!
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