Tag Archives: DC Comics

Why All The Nerd Rage?

1931_Frankenstein_img43

“Look, fellas! A film that didn’t go the way we wanted. Let’s burn it! BURN IT!!”

First off, I am a nerd. I freely admit it. I’m interested in and excited by many of the same things one thinks of typical nerds being interested in and excited by. I like comic books, Harry Potter, old monster movies, Star Trek, toys, science stuff, Star Wars, etc. I work at a comic book store. I blog about nerdy things. I understand the passion nerds have toward their thing.

I’m not into everything nerd, though. I don’t do cosplay. I’ve never participated in roll playing games. (Well, there was that one time in the ’70s when a friend tried to get me interested in Dungeons & Dragons. It just wasn’t for me.) I don’t play video games, because, honestly, I was never very good at them. I’ve never watched an episode of Game Of Thrones. (Yes, I’m aware that last statement has become today’s version of the “I’m vegan” boast. Sorry.) But, not everybody is into everything. Who has the time?

Still, I understand the passion. There was a time when I scoffed at Trekkers who dress as their favorite characters and go to conventions, but I realized I was being a jerk. Let the people indulge their passion. As long as they aren’t hurting themselves or others – what’s the problem? Have fun! Nerd out! Be proud!

I also understand the disappointment a nerd might feel when they believe one of their passions has let them down. It’s the rage that some express so publicly and so vehemently that puzzles me. The internet has made it possible for every nerd to have their say and, boy, are we having our say. (See update below.) Much of which, that I’ve seen anyway, is fairly benign. Some of it is quite interesting and well thought out and well presented.

But, there seems to be a small segment that needs to rage about stuff. And they also seem to need to be the first to express hate for something. On my podcast Dimland Radio (available on iTunes), for the last couple weeks, I talked about my bewilderment about a couple of raging nerds on social media being first in line to hate two movies that haven’t even been released yet!

These folks were angry at teaser trailers!

Teaser trailers!

What the hell? The movies haven’t been released, but they appear to want to be able to say, “I was the first to hate it!”

One trailer is for DC Comics’ upcoming stand-alone film focusing on the origin story of perhaps the greatest villain in comic books – The Joker. As I understand it, Joker, to be released in October, will not be a part of the same DC Universe as the other DC movies. However, it might connect to a future Batman movie.

That didn’t stop one particular nerd from expressing their hatred of the movie. Their main gripe was that Joaquin Phoenix was cast in the title role. The nerd wanted Willem Dafoe. Dafoe might have been a fine choice, but to rage about it? I mean, they weren’t just disappointed about the casting choice. They were angry.

20181023_n_nerdistnews_jokerupdate_feature-2

I tried to settle the person down by reminding them (twice) that the movie hasn’t been released yet. I was suggesting they put their rage on hold until they actually see the movie. They wouldn’t budge.

I think Joker looks like it could be very interesting and I’m looking forward to it.

But, then there’s the Star Wars franchise. Oh, my goodness. There may be no other nerd passion that can cause more rage than Star Wars.

Full disclosure here. I think the Prequels missed the mark. I think there was way too much George Lucas involved. He had attained such a high level of success and power that there was no one around to rein him in. No one to suggest less Jar Jar and more Darth Maul. No one to suggest the love story in Episode II is awful. No one to suggest that, though it looks really cool, the final lightsaber battle between Obi-Wan and Anakin taking place essentially inside a volcano is ridiculous.

d1pl4dn-089f8bc8-c6bd-4c35-90d0-24b82e9b0efb

“Sniff. Sniff. Anakin? Do you smell something cooking?”

“I do, Master. It’s us! We’re surrounded by lava! It’s just like being in an oven!”

The biggest problem with the Prequels was the audience never knew who was supposed to be us. Which character were we supposed to identify with? Anakin? Padme? Obi-Wan? Jar Jar?

In movies I’ve previously blogged about the audience knows who to identify with. In 12 Angry Men (1957) it’s Juror #8. In The Maltese Falcon (1941) it’s Sam Spade. In L.A. Confidential (1997) the audience is given three characters to put ourselves in the place of: Officer White, Lt. Exley, and Sgt. Vincennes. In a lesser movie, this might confuse the audience. But, for this movie, the script and the direction are so great the audience goes right along with it.

The Prequels didn’t have great scripts and direction.

I will say the Prequels aren’t all bad. Visually they are stunning. Although, I would argue the over-reliance on green screen and CGI caused a problem with the tone of the movies. The tone just didn’t feel the same as it did in the original trilogy.

So, I was disappointed by them. I’m not angry about it. They didn’t destroy my childhood. And I should say that I also don’t sense the nerd anger as strongly when it comes to the Prequels. Mainly, I think, the nerd reaction is more of an eye-rolling. The anger wasn’t quite there.

Then came the Sequels.

The Sequels’ arrival happen to coincide with the ubiquity of opinion on the internet, with the rise of social media. Now the rage could begin in earnest.

The Force Awakens? That’s just the same as A New Hope. At least the Prequels were different! The Last Jedi? That’s… that’s just too… different. These new movies have destroyed my childhood!!

Settle down.

I think these new Star Wars films do precisely what the Prequels did not: They match the tone of the originals. That may be, in part, due to the far more prominent use of practical effects than in Episodes I, II & III. Practical effects are there. They have mass. The actors can act with them. They still work better than CG effects, although CG is getting pretty damn good.

549247-star-wars-the-force-awakens

The characters are more well-defined. We are given a hero to follow and identify with: Rey. And we are given other new characters of interest: Finn and Poe. We have a complicated and compelling villain: Kylo Ren. We have a new plucky little friend: BB-8. And, of course, our old friends have returned: Han, Leia, Threepio, R2, Chewie, Yoda, and Luke.

Sure, the films aren’t perfect. Some of the jokes don’t land. Some of the dialogue is clunky. A character or two are bit on the cartoonish side. (Cough! Cough! Hux! Cough!) But the original trilogy wasn’t perfect either. Alec Guiness himself said at the time that he thought the dialogue wasn’t the best he’d read. So it’s not Mamet or Tarantino. So what? The Ewoks are a bit too teddy bearish to be taken seriously. So what? There’s no backstory for the Emperor. So what?

The movies are fun. And that’s what I want from a Star Wars movie.

Last week, the teaser trailer for Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker dropped. It looks fantastic! I don’t know that it will live up to the trailer, I’ll have to wait to see the movie to be sure, but I am excited.

I had an exchange with one angry nerd who, mere moments after the trailer was posted online, practically tripped over himself to announce to Facebook that they already hated it. “Look at me! I hated it first!”

The angry nerd lamented that Disney can’t match George Lucas’ storytelling ability. Really? Disney? Disney?!  Well, here’s his comment and my sarcastic response:

57096982_2132712163491654_7399409536320143360_n

For the record, I will say that I have really liked the Star Wars sequels and the side stories of Rogue One and Solo. In fact, I think The Last Jedi is one of the best of the entire series.

Maybe I’m just a nerd contrarian.

Update: I changed this line to include myself as one of the opinionated nerds. After all, I’m a nerd who is taking advantage of the internet to have my say, too. I’m just not raging about it.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Images used under Fair Use.

Warehouse Find is the official blog of NostalgiaZone.com, where you can find books, games, toys, cards, and a huge selection of Golden, Silver, Bronze, and Modern Age comic books. Jim also has a podcast called Dimland Radio. He’d love it if you checked it out. It’s available on iTunes.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Neal Adams Gets Another Great Cover

14424

This is the third time one of the all-time greats, Neal Adams, gets a great cover declaration by me. Adams was quite a force in comic books in the late 1960s into the 1970s. He brought a greater sense of realism to the look of comic art. Along with writer Denny O’Neil, he helped to bring Batman away from the campy influence of Adam West’s version as seen on the popular TV series. His Batman was more menacing and frightening. He was grittier. And much more dangerous.

But, it’s not a Batman cover that I’m looking at this month. As you can see, it’s the cover of DC Comics’ Strange Adventures #212 (June 1968) and it features one of the coolest looking characters in comic books (at least I think so): Deadman.

Deadman was created by Arnold Drake and Carmine Infantino. The character’s actual name was Boston Brand and he was a daring trapeze artist whose professional name was Deadman. Brand would wear the red costume and painted his face white for his performances under the big top. During a performance, an assassin known as Hook, whose missing hand had been replaced by a hook (what else?), murdered Brand. The acrobat became a ghost.

As a ghost, he kept the appearance of his Deadman trapeze artist persona. Deadman was determined to bring his murderer to justice. Using the power, given to him by the Hindu goddess Rama Kunsha, to possess the bodies of the living, he was determined to find his killer. Interesting character idea, don’t you think?

And look at that cover.

First off, it has a wicked Dutch angle. I like Dutch angles. It might be the influence of that campy Batman TV series on me, but I really do like them. And Adams gives us a darned dramatic one on this cover.

I think Adams also does an excellent job of using depth in this composition. Hook’s right arm and hook really look as though they are reaching off the cover toward the reader. It can be tricky getting that foreshortening just right. And Neal gets it just right.

And there’s the anatomy and poses of the characters that look real. This cover is a fine example of how Neal Adams made comic book art look possible in the real world while still being dynamic and exciting. This is also a good example of the grittiness this great artist was able to put across in his art. It’s so cinematic. This scene looks as though it resides in the same hard-bitten, dirty, grimy world as such film classics as The French Connection (1971), Midnight Cowboy (1969), and The Conversation (1974).

It’s a great cover.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Images used under Fair Use.

Warehouse Find is the official blog of NostalgiaZone.com, where you can find books, games, toys, cards, and a huge selection of Golden, Silver, Bronze, and Modern Age comic books. Jim also has a podcast called Dimland Radio. He’d love it if you checked it out. It’s available on iTunes.

Tagged , , ,

George Perez: Quite An Artist, Quite A Legacy

This past weekend George Perez, one of the comic book industry’s greatest illustrators, announced he was retiring.

Retire? Hold on while I look that up…

“To withdraw from one’s position or occupation or from one’s active working life.”

What?! People can do that? How do their bills get paid?

Huh. Oh, well.

So, Perez is doing this retire thing and that got me thinking of when I first saw his illustrations. As I wrote in my blog about discovering Marvel’s The Uncanny X-Men in the summer of 1978, I had just determined to become serious about collecting comic books and start buying titles and reading the storylines, instead just buying books with interesting covers. Along with The X-men, I began buying The Avengers.

The first issue I picked up with this new zeal for comics was The Avengers #171 (May, 1978).

19169

It’s cover was drawn by George Perez and inked by Terry Austin and they proved to be a nearly as potent a creative team as John Byrne  and Austin were on The X-Men. The interior art of this issue of The Avengers was inked by Pablo Marcos and he proved to be an even better fit with Perez’s pencils. Some penciler and inker combinations are truly magical. Perez and Marcos was one such combo.

I quickly began scarfing up back issues of The Avengers, which had become my favorite title. (Oh, how I wish I had done the same with the Dave Cockrum drawn X-Men issues.) And what I saw was a young artist becoming great.

av141_2-3

Perez’s early work in the Avengers was more simple and maybe a little awkward. Some of that was undoubtedly due to the inkers he was paired up with in those early days. His drawings with Vince Colletta or Sam Grainger inking weren’t quite there yet. (See the example from Avengers #141 with Colletta inking, above.) Perez was showing promise, but he was still getting settled in and when he teamed up with Marcos his artwork soared.

avengers-161-14

By the time Avengers #161 was produced, Perez and Marcos were creating incredible pages. The action sequences were more dramatic and dynamic. The characters’ anatomy and poses were also more dramatic and more precisely drawn. In the example (see above), how great is that explosive first panel? And the expression on Iron Man’s… um… mask in the fourth panel is far more expressive than any of the faces in that earlier sample.

And Perez’s blossoming as an artist was not only confined to the pages of Earth’s Mightest Heroes. He also turned out some fine work in Marvel’s adaption of the 1976 sci-fi classic Logan’s Run. For that series he was teamed up with inker Klaus Janson. And they also gelled well together. In the first sample, just look at the center frame. Fantastic!

lf

The second sample is an outstanding example of his dramatic splash pages. Also from the Logan’s Run series.

perez logan's run 2 page 31

Finally, I want to look at a cover he did for the Fantastic Four #184 (July, 1977). He did a run of both covers and interior art with pioneer inker Joe Sinnott. Now, I think Sinnott was a fine inker, but by the 1970s his inking tended to overshadow the artist, not compliment them. However, Perez’s style was not too adversely affected.

22050

I also want to point out that Perez could be a maniac when it came to drawing backgrounds. There would sometimes be an incredible amount of detail involved, but he kept it under control and kept his covers and pages from looking too busy. That’s not an easy thing to do. I think the two covers I’ve included here are good examples of his attention to detail.

And this is all just his work from the 1970s!

George Perez’s career in comic books would span an additional four decades! Over those decades, his artwork maintained the highest quality as he worked for both Marvel and DC Comics. His work always looked fresh. He kept up with the times, while never losing that classic George Perez look. That in itself is a rare and terrific feat.

The man has left an impressive legacy as he now embarks on his well-earned retirement.

Kudos, Mr. Perez!

79fcec4d750e2590f2d8ff7219f7e652

And, for my money, no one drew Ultron better than George Perez!

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Images used under Fair Use.

Warehouse Find is the official blog of NostalgiaZone.com, where you can find books, games, toys, cards, and a huge selection of Golden, Silver, Bronze, and Modern Age comic books. Jim also has a podcast called Dimland Radio. He’d love it if you checked it out. It’s available on iTunes.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

She’s Wanted And On A Great Cover

17837

Returning to my weekly blog (did you miss me?) just in time to showcase another great comic book cover as part of my monthly series focusing on some of the great covers in the history of comic books. This month I stay with DC Comics (last month I did a Superman: The Man Of Steel cover) to examine the cover of Wonder Woman #240 from February, 1978.

This cover is a little unusual for a super-hero comic. There’s no battle. Wonder Woman isn’t shown to be in any immediate danger. The villain, if that is what he is, seems to be either moving quickly or nervously. It’s difficult to tell if those motion lines depict rapid movement or a shaky hand. I think it’s a shaky hand.

And is that a star on the cuff of the man’s coat? Is this man a general? Does his military status, the top secret file, and the wanted poster mean the American government is after Woman Wonder? What has she done?

So many questions brought up by the cover.

The artwork is top notch. Drawn by one of DC’s best artists Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez and inked by DC’s inking machine Dick Giordano. Garcia-Lopez’s style is crisp and clean. His linework is simple and elegant. And his action and anatomy drawing is terrific.

There’s an attention to detail on this cover that is very impressive. The perspective drawing is solid as the artist shows us the top secret file and stamp, the wanted poster, the drawer, gun, and even the everyday items found on a work desk. Right down to the paper clips in the cup and the wood grain on the drawer. There’s even a nick in the drawer to show the desk have been lived in.

Even with all those details, the reader never loses sight of the cover’s action.

I think it’s a great cover.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Images used under Fair Use.

Warehouse Find is the official blog of NostalgiaZone.com, where you can find books, games, toys, cards, and a huge selection of Golden, Silver, Bronze, and Modern Age comic books.

Tagged , , ,

This Month’s Great Cover Has A Lantern Jaw

53272

Just look at that!

In the January, 1993 issue of Superman (#75), our hero from the planet Kryton had died defeating what seemed to be an unstoppable foe: Doomsday. In the months that followed, as Superman lay “dead,” four characters stepped in to fill his sizable shoes. They were Eradicator, Superboy, Cyborg Superman, and Steel. Eventually, the real Superman rose from the dead (hardly anyone stays dead in comic books for very long) to take up the task of once again fighting for Truth, Justice, and the American Way.

This month’s great cover is from Superman: The Man Of Steel #25 (September, 1993). It was drawn by Jon Bogdanove and inked by Dennis Janke. Bogdanove had started working for Marvel Comics in 1986, then he hopped on over to DC Comics in 1991 and became part of the team that created the Man Of Steel title in an expansion of the titles featuring our hero from another world. Then, in the wake of Superman’s death, the team created a new hero named Steel to take over the title.

1993 was part of th23188at awful time period when comic book art began to drown in unnecessary linework. Lines! Lines! Lines! Marvel and Image Comics led the way in this era in which some artists forgot to leave room for color, adding more and more lines, while some inkers also abandoned the use of varying line weight to show the shape of things. Look at the cover of The Incredible Hulk #341 (March, 1988), drawn and inked by Todd MacFarlane, one of the artists who issued in this flood of undisciplined linework. Now, imagine there’s no color, it’s a black and white line drawing. Without the color it would be difficult to tell just what the hell is going on. So many unnecessary lines, which all have more or less the same weight to them.

Compare MacFarlane’s cover to this month’s great cover. Bogdanove and Janke use plenty of lines for shading, but the lines are disciplined. They are loose in their execution, but they are placed right where they are needed. There are thick and thin lines. They make sense. You can tell exactly what is going on. And they leave room for color, which was masterfully provided by Janke.

I love a good close-up and Bogdanove and Janke nailed this one. This, my friends, is how you draw an angry, determined, about-to-kick-your-butt Superman!

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Images used under Fair Use.

Warehouse Find is the official blog of NostalgiaZone.com, where you can find books, games, toys, cards, and a huge selection of Golden, Silver, Bronze, and Modern Age comic books.

Correction (12-5-18): I had the scope of the Superman: Man Of Steel title wrong. When the series started in 1991 it featured Superman. I had originally indicated the series was created to fill the void of the missing hero. The correction has been made.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

A Great Comic Cover From The Days Before Zombies Were Played Out. (They Are Played Out, Right?)

856116

The best month of the year has once again arrived. Seriously, it’s awesome. The weather, at least where I live, is so much more pleasant than any other time of the year. Baseball’s postseason kicks off and, boy, I hope the Hated Yankees lose. (You should, too!) My wife and I celebrate our wedding anniversary. And the best month is capped off by the best holiday – Halloween!

Come on! How could any month be better?

Since the capper is Halloween, it’s my tradition to declare a comic book cover that depicts the macabre as great. So, this October I declare the cover of Batman #453 (Late August 1990) to be great. It was drawn by one of my favorite artists Mike Mignola, with inks by George Pratt.

Mignola is one of those artists who when he first started in the field attempted to conform to a more traditional superhero drawing style. Fortunately, he began to draw the way he wanted to and his work got so much more interesting. At least, to me.

This cover of Batman came out during the later stage of his change over in his style. And it’s great. Batman is best when he’s depicted on the macabre side (Kelley Jones also excelled at the macabre Batman) and Mignola’s deceptively simple line work is on par with David Mazzucchelli’s work on the Batman: Year One storyline from 1987. (A terrific story arc!)

Just look at it! Stark contrast, muted colors, a graveyard with a demon-headed tombstone, the Dark Knight, and the undead! It’s great, I tell ya! Great!

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Images used under Fair Use.

Warehouse Find is the official blog of NostalgiaZone.com, where you can find books, games, toys, cards, and a huge selection of Golden, Silver, Bronze, and Modern Age comic books.

Tagged , ,

Atlas/Seaboard Produced At Least One Great Cover

Targitt_001-01

Martin Goodman, founder of Marvel Comics, left his company in 1972 (he had sold it in 1968). He went on to form a new comic book and magazine publishing company called Atlas Comics in 1974. It’s referred to today as Atlas/Seaboard so as not to confuse it with Goodman’s other publishing company called Atlas that later became Marvel in 1961. He wanted to compete with the big two: DC Comics and, of course, his former company. He hired Stan Lee’s brother Larry Lieber as an editor and offered good money, along with rights to character creations and ownership of their artwork, to freelance artists to get them to come aboard.

He did get some of the big names in the field at the time. Steve Ditko, Neal Adams, John Severin, Russ Heath, and others all lent their considerable talents to the venture.

I can remember being excited about a new comic book company. I even bought a few of their comics. But, the mid 1970s was a rough time for comic books, even for the big two. Atlas just couldn’t compete and it folded in late 1975. None of their titles went more than four issues.

At least one great cover was produced in the upstart’s brief existence. This great cover isn’t by Adams or Ditko or any of the big name artists of the day. It’s also not by the then up and coming Howard Chaykin. No, this cover of the first issue of Targitt (March, 1975) was drawn and inked by Dick Giordano.

Giordano was more known for inking comics over at DC than for being an artist. But, as an artist, he was pretty good. You can see an influence from Neal Adams on this cover, most notably the arm of the bad guy wielding a knife. This makes sense, because Giordano inked a lot of Adams’ pencils for DC.

The Dutch angle might be a little on the severe side. I mean, they are obviously on a ship. Are the seas that rough? If so, why is the deck so dry? Oh. The bad guy’s “going down with the ship” comment isn’t just a pun? Well, the severity adds to the tension and impending action of the scene. Besides, I like Dutch angles.

I do think it was a mistake to have the guy with the speargun getting off a shot. He’s so close to a fellow standing stock still and yet he misses? Did he attend the Imperial Stormtrooper Academy™? Perhaps it’s just a warning shot.

I also like the idea of the character of Targitt. He’s an FBI agent bent on revenge against the Mob who was responsible for the death of his wife and child. There’s a whole Dirty Harry/Death Wish/Punisher vibe to the guy. But, Atlas decided over the next two issues to turn him into a costumed superhero. That was a mistake.

Atlas may have been short-lived, but they gave us this great cover.

Packing Peanuts!

Feel free to comment and share.

Images used under Fair Use.

 

Tagged , , , , , ,