Tag Archives: Buzzcocks

The Year Is 1977. The List Is Ten Alternative Albums From That Year.

The world was witnessing the early stages of Punk Rock in 1977, sounding the death knell of Disco. OK, maybe not that dramatic, but the music listening public was seeing the first main wave of Punk albums being released in 1977. Seven of the ten albums I will list are debut releases. 1977 was fertile ground for new recording artists.

One of my entries might not be considered alternative, but it is difficult to categorize. Besides, this is my blog and I can include what I want. Also, the first reggae album I’ve ever ranked is included in this list.

So far I have done lists for 1979, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, and 1986-1989. And, as always, this is my list, your results may vary…

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10) Equal Rights – Peter Tosh Right off the bat is the first reggae album to be featured in one of these lists. I like reggae, but I don’t listen to it often and I don’t have many albums of that music from Jamaica. But, I do have this one. The opening track (my favorite) was co-written by Bob Marley and was originally recorded by The Wailers, but I prefer Tosh’s version. I also prefer Tosh’s voice to Marley’s. This is a nice, relaxing album about the need for equal rights and justice with a little religious undertone throughout.

Favorite track: Get Up, Stand Up

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9) Spiral Scratch – Buzzcocks The first debut release on this list is an EP by one of my favorite bands to emerge from UK’s Punk scene. Four pretty raw blasts of Punk energy featuring Howard Devoto on vocals. Devoto would not be with the band for long, but he did help set the tone and direction the band would take in his absence, when Pete Shelley would take over lead vocals.

Favorite track: Boredom

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8) Cheap Trick – Cheap Trick Maybe not exactly alternative, this debut album by the power pop rockers from Illinois is awfully hard edged when to compared to their albums that followed. They address pedophilia (Daddy Should Have Stayed In High School), serial killer Richard Speck (The Ballad of TV Violence), and the suicide of a friend of the band (Oh, Candy). It also features their excellent power ballad Mandocello.

Favorite track: Hot Love

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7) Pink Flag – Wire 21 tracks on this first studio release by these British art punkers. Wire demonstrated that Punk didn’t have to follow any rules. They went where their art took them, including into some very catchy pop (Mannequin). More than half a dozen songs clock in at less than one minute!

Favorite track: 12 X U

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6) Rocket To Russia – Ramones This is the third album by the original punk rockers from New York, so they’ve been showing those Brits how to do it for a while by 1977. A couple excellent covers (Do You Wanna Dance? and Surfin’ Bird) along with plenty of classically twisted Ramones originals (Cretin Hop, We’re A Happy Family, and my favorite track) make this a must-own for any fan of alternative music.

Favorite track: Teenage Lobotomy

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5) Never Mind The Bollocks, Here’s The Sex Pistols – Sex Pistols A tighter collection of songs than you might expect from the kings of the UK Punk Rock scene. This is the only official studio album released by the Pistols and that seems completely proper considering the volatile nature of this band. This album set the template for a great number of lesser punk bands to follow. It has plenty of kick ass tracks including Holiday in the Sun, Anarchy in the UK, God Save the Queen and EMI, the band’s screed against their record label and the music industry itself.

Favorite Track: Pretty Vacant

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4) The Clash – The Clash Another debut album, this one is by what would become known as “the only band that matters.” It’s the US version of which I am more familiar, so I’m kinda bending the rule here, because, technically, that version was released in 1979. Oh, well, the US version is being used here because it’s the Punk thing to do and it does contain my favorite track. There are plenty of good songs on this one: Janie Jones, White Riot, Career Opportunities, and (White Man) In Hammersmith Palais to name a few.

Favorite track: I Fought the Law

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3) Talking Heads: 77 – Talking Heads Yep, another debut album. New York’s Talking Heads took a more artful approach to the Punk Rock sound. David Byrne’s unusual and detached vocals preside over a really tight band. They explored and embraced a kind of quirky worldview both lyrically and musically. (Can you explore a worldview musically? Oh, well, it sounded good when I wrote it.) And there’s a sense of fun to this album that is missing from much of the alternative music of this time.

Favorite track: Psycho Killer

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2) Low – David Bowie Part of his “Berlin Trilogy,” Low is my favorite album by Bowie. Much of the music was written with the intent of being used as the score for Bowie’s film debut, The Man Who Fell To Earth, but the director didn’t think it worked. The second half of the album consists of mostly instrumental tracks. Very moody.

Favorite track: Sound And Vision

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1) In The City – The Jam Heavily influenced by my favorite band The Who, how could this debut album from the UK’s top Mod rock band not be number one on my list? Filled with forceful, brash, and blaring rock songs with power chords aplenty, The Jam quickly shot to the top of my list of favorite bands. The Jam were also influenced by 60s garage rock and the Motown sound, mixing all of it to become one to the UK’s most popular acts. They even cover the Batman Theme!

Favorite track (Tie): In The City and Art School

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1979. A great year in alternative music.

Ever since I went to art school in the mid-80s, my musical tastes have favored the alternative stuff. And, at the time, I can remember friends of mine with a similar taste in music remarking on how many of our favorite albums came out in 1979. I’m not sure why it was such a good year for alternative music. Perhaps it was that the punk bands getting better at playing their instruments. I guess the world will never know, but so what?

I’ve compiled a top ten list of my favorite punk or post-punk or power pop punk (is there such a thing?) from that great year in music: 1979…

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10) Look Sharp! – Joe Jackson  It may have had a Top 40 hit with Is She Really Going Out With Him?, but Jackson’s punkish pop waves the alternative banner quite well. In 1990, when the thrash metal band Anthrax covered Got The Time a friend said that it surprised him that he liked it so much. I said, “Of course, you do. Joe Jackson wrote it!”

Favorite track: Got The Time

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9) Regatta de Blanc – The Police  This album did fairly well, reaching 25 on the US album chart, but I still consider the band to have been in the alt bin in 1979. I think their brand of punk-infused reggae or reggae-infused punk, whichever, is great. These guys might just make it.

Favorite track: Message In A Bottle

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8) The Specials – The Specials  Produced by Elvis Costello, this album of two-tone British ska is still awfully infectious. Who knew an album filled with songs about unemployment, bad marriages, underage pregnancy, awful tasting beer, and racism could be so much fun.

Favorite track: A Message to You, Rudy

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7) The Undertones – The Undertones  This is what I mean by power pop punk. This Irish punk band produced a debut album of one pogo-inducing song after another. I loved the first time I listened to it.

Favorite track: Get Over You

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6) London Calling – The Clash  I realize having this album by the “only band that matters” in the sixth spot in a top ten list may seem low, but just think how great the rest of the list will be. Even though this album was released in December 1979, Rolling Stone magazine declared it the greatest album of the 80s. Go figure. It is an excellent album that demonstrated punk was so much more than leather jackets, safety pins, and slam dancing.

Favorite track: London Calling

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5) Fear Of Music – Talking Heads  The punk rock of New York City was very different than that of the UK. It was more arty than political. Always artful, this album found Talking Heads beginning to expand their sound, taking on some of that World Music feel they would later cultivate. Depending on what day you might ask me, I usually consider this my favorite Talking Heads effort.

Favorite track: I Zimbra

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4) Entertainment! – Gang of Four  Another hell of a debut album makes this list. Andy Gill is on my list of favorite guitarists; his choppy, feedback-laden rhythm guitar is mesmerizing. The lyrics are challenging in their socialist, anti-capitalist ideals; and the music blends disco and punk seamlessly.

Favorite track: I Found That Essence Rare

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3) Setting Sons – The Jam  If I had to rank my all-time favorite bands The Jam would likely come in number three, behind The Who and XTC, respectively. Being a bit of a Mod myself in those days, The Jam really appealed to me and this is my favorite of their albums.

Favorite track: Thick As Thieves

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2) Drums And Wires – XTC  XTC is my second favorite band and they’re not number one on this list?! Yep. Did The Who release an album in 1979? Yes, but not a new studio album.

This is an excellent album, their first after keyboardist Barry Andrews left and guitarist Dave Gregory joined. The sound is notably different without Andrews’ maniac keyboard playing. But Gregory was able to expand their sound and point the band into a direction away from quirky pop to a more rock heavy sound and then, later, a more pastoral form of pop music.

Favorite track: Making Plans For Nigel

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1) A Different Kind of Tension – Buzzcocks  My goodness, but this is a great album! I hadn’t listened to it in a while, until just recently. And when I did listen to it again, I was blown away.

Buzzcocks are another example of what I call power pop punk. Their songs can be extremely catchy. Listening to this album again had the 25 year-old in me wishing the 51 year-old me could still skank and pogo the way I used to: To exhaustion when seeing this band in concert. The knees and the back just won’t allow it.

These songs are all very tight and driven by some excellent drumming. This album is as much about the drums as it is about the swirling, buzzing guitars and drummer John Maher scores big. The transition from the end of Mad, Mad Judy (with the fantastic closing line, “I’ve got all the answers!”) to Raison D’etre takes my breath away. It’s possibly the greatest such transition between two songs ever!

The album is simply relentless and, I my opinion, the best album of 1979.

Favorite track: The whole damn album!

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